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Animal Inequality and Organizations

Animal Inequality and Organizations ORGANIZATION & ENVIRONMENT / December 2000 Gaines, Jermier / ANIMAL INEQUALITY Symposium on Vivisection, Animal Equality, and Organizations Introduction JEANNIE GAINES JOHN M. JERMIER University of South Florida A man is really ethical only when he obeys the constraint laid on him to help all life . . . when he goes out of his way to avoid injuring anything living. He does not ask how far this or that life deserves sympathy as valuable in itself, nor how far it is capa- ble of feeling. To him, life as such is sacred. —Schweitzer (1929/1989, p. 33) Tragically, on a daily basis, there are numerous acts of cruelty and violence toward animals committed by individuals. However, the vast majority of animal mistreatment, torture, and killing comes, directly or indirectly, out of the very orga- nizations that feed us, clothe us, clean our faces and our floors, entertain us, treat our illnesses, and provide for our livelihoods by employing us. To elaborate: What once was the family farm is now agribusiness, or factory farming. On an average day in the United States, 130,000 cows, 7,000 calves, 360,000 pigs, and 24 million chickens are killed (Williams, 1997). Enormous num- bers of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Organization & Environment SAGE

Animal Inequality and Organizations

Organization & Environment , Volume 13 (4): 3 – Dec 1, 2000

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References (6)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1086-0266
eISSN
1552-7417
DOI
10.1177/1086026600134003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORGANIZATION & ENVIRONMENT / December 2000 Gaines, Jermier / ANIMAL INEQUALITY Symposium on Vivisection, Animal Equality, and Organizations Introduction JEANNIE GAINES JOHN M. JERMIER University of South Florida A man is really ethical only when he obeys the constraint laid on him to help all life . . . when he goes out of his way to avoid injuring anything living. He does not ask how far this or that life deserves sympathy as valuable in itself, nor how far it is capa- ble of feeling. To him, life as such is sacred. —Schweitzer (1929/1989, p. 33) Tragically, on a daily basis, there are numerous acts of cruelty and violence toward animals committed by individuals. However, the vast majority of animal mistreatment, torture, and killing comes, directly or indirectly, out of the very orga- nizations that feed us, clothe us, clean our faces and our floors, entertain us, treat our illnesses, and provide for our livelihoods by employing us. To elaborate: What once was the family farm is now agribusiness, or factory farming. On an average day in the United States, 130,000 cows, 7,000 calves, 360,000 pigs, and 24 million chickens are killed (Williams, 1997). Enormous num- bers of

Journal

Organization & EnvironmentSAGE

Published: Dec 1, 2000

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