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“Being in a Funk”: Teens’ Efforts to Understand Their Depressive Experiences

“Being in a Funk”: Teens’ Efforts to Understand Their Depressive Experiences Although there is literature about adults’ experiences of depression, little research has focused on teenagers’ experiences. In this article, the authors describe how a sample of adolescents makes sense of depression and responds to a depression diagnosis. Twenty-two adolescents participated in in-depth individual or focus group interviews. Teens discussed their experiences with depression and getting health care for depression, and described a trajectory similar to that found among adults: a slow growth of distress, a time of being in a funk, and a time of consideration of whether they are depressed. Teens who received a diagnosis from a medical provider then sought to make sense of their depression. Teens understood a depression diagnosis as a helpful label, a chronic medical problem, or a significant part of their identity. Understanding the subjective experience of adolescents who are depressed might increase health care providers’empathy and improve their communication with teens. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Qualitative Health Research SAGE

“Being in a Funk”: Teens’ Efforts to Understand Their Depressive Experiences

Qualitative Health Research , Volume 14 (9): 12 – Nov 1, 2004

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References (30)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1049-7323
eISSN
1552-7557
DOI
10.1177/1049732304268657
pmid
15448297
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although there is literature about adults’ experiences of depression, little research has focused on teenagers’ experiences. In this article, the authors describe how a sample of adolescents makes sense of depression and responds to a depression diagnosis. Twenty-two adolescents participated in in-depth individual or focus group interviews. Teens discussed their experiences with depression and getting health care for depression, and described a trajectory similar to that found among adults: a slow growth of distress, a time of being in a funk, and a time of consideration of whether they are depressed. Teens who received a diagnosis from a medical provider then sought to make sense of their depression. Teens understood a depression diagnosis as a helpful label, a chronic medical problem, or a significant part of their identity. Understanding the subjective experience of adolescents who are depressed might increase health care providers’empathy and improve their communication with teens.

Journal

Qualitative Health ResearchSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 2004

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