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Book Review: Ask the Beasts: Darwin and the God of Love

Book Review: Ask the Beasts: Darwin and the God of Love ATR/97.1 152 Anglican Theological Review What is less clear is why it is the church that fills this role and not some other group who is invested in the same ideals. I suspect that the cultic character of Christian life provides some distinction on this matter, but what ritual contributes to liberal Christianity is not adequately spelled out by Hobson. What we learn is that ritual does not necessarily equate to sacramental, and that practices of worship and service are essential to the liberal Christian equation, yet Hobson seems of two minds when it comes to defining what the cultic and ritual aspects of the church are meant to do. At one level, ritual is to be avoided if it becomes the source of “institutional regulation”; at an- other level, Christianity at its base is cultic, and ritual the central application of this cultic life. It would seem that communal celebration is a critical aspect of Christian life as long as the “institution” doesn’t interfere. This notion sup- ports Hobson’s concern with individual liberty all the while raising a serious question about the worth of the church. In Reinventing Liberal Christianity, Hobson has cleared some concep- tual ground in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anglican Theological Review SAGE

Book Review: Ask the Beasts: Darwin and the God of Love

Anglican Theological Review , Volume 97 (1): 1 – Aug 16, 2021

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2015 Anglican Theological Review Corporation
ISSN
0003-3286
eISSN
2163-6214
DOI
10.1177/000332861509700125
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ATR/97.1 152 Anglican Theological Review What is less clear is why it is the church that fills this role and not some other group who is invested in the same ideals. I suspect that the cultic character of Christian life provides some distinction on this matter, but what ritual contributes to liberal Christianity is not adequately spelled out by Hobson. What we learn is that ritual does not necessarily equate to sacramental, and that practices of worship and service are essential to the liberal Christian equation, yet Hobson seems of two minds when it comes to defining what the cultic and ritual aspects of the church are meant to do. At one level, ritual is to be avoided if it becomes the source of “institutional regulation”; at an- other level, Christianity at its base is cultic, and ritual the central application of this cultic life. It would seem that communal celebration is a critical aspect of Christian life as long as the “institution” doesn’t interfere. This notion sup- ports Hobson’s concern with individual liberty all the while raising a serious question about the worth of the church. In Reinventing Liberal Christianity, Hobson has cleared some concep- tual ground in

Journal

Anglican Theological ReviewSAGE

Published: Aug 16, 2021

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