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Book Review: The Jukebox in the Garden: Ecocriticism and American Popular Music Since 1960

Book Review: The Jukebox in the Garden: Ecocriticism and American Popular Music Since 1960 Book Reviews 333 challenge traditional understandings of sacrifice, and a variety of more empirical case studies that show the concept at work in contemporary politics. However, with Jimmy Carter hovering about my reading, I would have liked an historical overview of the emergence and appeal to sacrifice in environmental debate. Was this concept central to Progressive-Era conservationists? How did its usage in earlier eras of environmental debate differ from current ones? Do the religious over- tones of sacrifice reinforce a form of privilege in environmental discourse? Questions such as these reveal a more significant weakness of the volume. While several chapters touch on the issue of justice in the context of sacrifice and the problem of confusing “unwilling sacrifices” with coercion, the idea of environmental “sacrifice zones” is only mentioned briefly in one chap- ter. This absence is consistent with a troubling tendency to conceptualize sacrifice from the per- spective of the affluent. The vast majority of examples apply primarily to upper middle class Americans—bikes or cars, green consumption, suburbia. Paul Wapner makes this tendency explicit when he explains that his usage of “we” throughout the chapter refers to those “who live in the developed world and enjoy a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Organization & Environment SAGE

Book Review: The Jukebox in the Garden: Ecocriticism and American Popular Music Since 1960

Organization & Environment , Volume 24 (3): 3 – Sep 1, 2011

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References (1)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© SAGE Publications 2011
ISSN
1086-0266
eISSN
1552-7417
DOI
10.1177/1086026611422047
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews 333 challenge traditional understandings of sacrifice, and a variety of more empirical case studies that show the concept at work in contemporary politics. However, with Jimmy Carter hovering about my reading, I would have liked an historical overview of the emergence and appeal to sacrifice in environmental debate. Was this concept central to Progressive-Era conservationists? How did its usage in earlier eras of environmental debate differ from current ones? Do the religious over- tones of sacrifice reinforce a form of privilege in environmental discourse? Questions such as these reveal a more significant weakness of the volume. While several chapters touch on the issue of justice in the context of sacrifice and the problem of confusing “unwilling sacrifices” with coercion, the idea of environmental “sacrifice zones” is only mentioned briefly in one chap- ter. This absence is consistent with a troubling tendency to conceptualize sacrifice from the per- spective of the affluent. The vast majority of examples apply primarily to upper middle class Americans—bikes or cars, green consumption, suburbia. Paul Wapner makes this tendency explicit when he explains that his usage of “we” throughout the chapter refers to those “who live in the developed world and enjoy a

Journal

Organization & EnvironmentSAGE

Published: Sep 1, 2011

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