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Care Provision in Housing With Supportive Services: The Importance of Care Type, Individual Characteristics, and Care Site

Care Provision in Housing With Supportive Services: The Importance of Care Type, Individual... Housing with supportive services is an important long-term sector, but information about care provision to residents in these settings is largely unavailable. The role of individual characteristics versus facility identity in determining how care is provided is completely unexplored. Data from 60 facilities in a single state were used to investigate the degree to which individual characteristics and facility identity determined how much care was provided to residents. Individual characteristics had the greatest impact on the amount of direct care time received by individuals. Care that was dementia oriented (i.e., cueing), however, was more strongly affected by the identity of the facility than by individual characteristics. These results have important implications for how consumers should think about seeking, and policy makers should think about supporting, care for those with impaired cognitive status who utilize housing with supportive services. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Gerontology SAGE

Care Provision in Housing With Supportive Services: The Importance of Care Type, Individual Characteristics, and Care Site

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References (22)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0733-4648
eISSN
1552-4523
DOI
10.1177/0733464804271453
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Housing with supportive services is an important long-term sector, but information about care provision to residents in these settings is largely unavailable. The role of individual characteristics versus facility identity in determining how care is provided is completely unexplored. Data from 60 facilities in a single state were used to investigate the degree to which individual characteristics and facility identity determined how much care was provided to residents. Individual characteristics had the greatest impact on the amount of direct care time received by individuals. Care that was dementia oriented (i.e., cueing), however, was more strongly affected by the identity of the facility than by individual characteristics. These results have important implications for how consumers should think about seeking, and policy makers should think about supporting, care for those with impaired cognitive status who utilize housing with supportive services.

Journal

Journal of Applied GerontologySAGE

Published: Feb 1, 2005

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