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Chapter 4: Critical Race Theory and Education: History, Theory, and Implications

Chapter 4: Critical Race Theory and Education: History, Theory, and Implications Chapter 4 Critical Race Theory and Education: History, Theory, and Implications WILLIAM F. TATE IV University of Wisconsin—Madison In 1993 President Clinton nominated Professor Lani Guinier of the University of Pennsylvania Law School to be assistant attorney general in charge of the Civil Rights Division. Her nomination for this government post resulted in a large con­ troversy centering on her scholarship (Guinier, 1991a, 1991b). Guinier's research, which examined voting systems, asked the following question: Are there factors that guarantee winners and losers? She contended that such factors do exist and that race is too often an important factor in the construction of voting districts, the outcome of elections, and ultimately political influence, including the control of educational systems. Guinier (1989) argued that the political system must be rejuvenated to be more inclusive. Specifically, she called for the creation of electoral schemes that would allow Blacks to elect candidates representing their interests. These schemes—proportional voting, in particular—were already a reality in many south­ ern localities and had received endorsement from the Reagan-Bush Justice Department and the Supreme Court. Professor Guinier also was critical of political bargaining between leading civil rights groups, African American politicians, and Republicans that resulted in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Review of Research in Education SAGE

Chapter 4: Critical Race Theory and Education: History, Theory, and Implications

Review of Research in Education , Volume 22 (1): 53 – Jan 1, 1997

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References (178)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0091-732X
eISSN
1935-1038
DOI
10.3102/0091732X022001195
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter 4 Critical Race Theory and Education: History, Theory, and Implications WILLIAM F. TATE IV University of Wisconsin—Madison In 1993 President Clinton nominated Professor Lani Guinier of the University of Pennsylvania Law School to be assistant attorney general in charge of the Civil Rights Division. Her nomination for this government post resulted in a large con­ troversy centering on her scholarship (Guinier, 1991a, 1991b). Guinier's research, which examined voting systems, asked the following question: Are there factors that guarantee winners and losers? She contended that such factors do exist and that race is too often an important factor in the construction of voting districts, the outcome of elections, and ultimately political influence, including the control of educational systems. Guinier (1989) argued that the political system must be rejuvenated to be more inclusive. Specifically, she called for the creation of electoral schemes that would allow Blacks to elect candidates representing their interests. These schemes—proportional voting, in particular—were already a reality in many south­ ern localities and had received endorsement from the Reagan-Bush Justice Department and the Supreme Court. Professor Guinier also was critical of political bargaining between leading civil rights groups, African American politicians, and Republicans that resulted in the

Journal

Review of Research in EducationSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 1997

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