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Classification and Behavior of Canine Mammary Epithelial Neoplasms Based on Life-span Observations in Beagles

Classification and Behavior of Canine Mammary Epithelial Neoplasms Based on Life-span... As part of a study of the effects of low-level radiation, 1,343 Beagles, including 671 males and 672 females, were evaluated over their full lifetime for the occurrence of mammary neoplasia; there were 139 control males and 138 control females and 532 irradiated males and 534 irradiated females. All nodules found in surgical specimens or at necropsy were evaluated histologically. The overall incidence, metastasis and recurrence rates, and contribution to mortality of mammary neoplasms were determined. Based on this unique opportunity to correlate morphologic characteristics with ultimate biological behavior of all mammary tumors in a defined canine population, we propose a histogenetically based reclassification of epithelial mammary tumors. Of the 672 female dogs, 70.8% (476) had at least one mammary neoplasm; 60.7% (408) had more than one. Two male dogs had mammary neoplasms. Of 1,639 mammary carcinomas in the 672 females, 18.7% (307) were classified as ductular carcinomas (arising from the small interlobular or intralobular ductules), whereas 80.7% (1,322) were classified as adenocarcinomas of other histogenetic origin. Of 73 fatal carcinomas, ductular carcinomas accounted for 48 fatalities (65.8%), whereas other adenocarcinomas accounted for only 20 fatalities (27.4%). Radiation had no effect on this ratio. Ductular carcinomas also had a higher rate of metastasis than did adenocarcinomas. Existing classifications of mammary carcinomas do not recognize the characteristic morphologic features, the degree of malignancy, and the prognostic importance of these ductular carcinomas. Metastasis rates did not differ between simple and complex carcinomas or between those lesions and adenocarcinomas in mixed tumors. True carcinosarcomas metastasized more frequently (100%, or 5/5) than did adenocarcinomas in mixed tumors (34.4%, or 22/64), emphasizing the importance of not lumping these tumors under the classification of malignant mixed tumors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Veterinary Pathology SAGE

Classification and Behavior of Canine Mammary Epithelial Neoplasms Based on Life-span Observations in Beagles

Veterinary Pathology , Volume 36 (5): 14 – Sep 1, 1999

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References (47)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1999 American College of Veterinary Pathologists
ISSN
0300-9858
eISSN
1544-2217
DOI
10.1354/vp.36-5-423
pmid
10490210
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

As part of a study of the effects of low-level radiation, 1,343 Beagles, including 671 males and 672 females, were evaluated over their full lifetime for the occurrence of mammary neoplasia; there were 139 control males and 138 control females and 532 irradiated males and 534 irradiated females. All nodules found in surgical specimens or at necropsy were evaluated histologically. The overall incidence, metastasis and recurrence rates, and contribution to mortality of mammary neoplasms were determined. Based on this unique opportunity to correlate morphologic characteristics with ultimate biological behavior of all mammary tumors in a defined canine population, we propose a histogenetically based reclassification of epithelial mammary tumors. Of the 672 female dogs, 70.8% (476) had at least one mammary neoplasm; 60.7% (408) had more than one. Two male dogs had mammary neoplasms. Of 1,639 mammary carcinomas in the 672 females, 18.7% (307) were classified as ductular carcinomas (arising from the small interlobular or intralobular ductules), whereas 80.7% (1,322) were classified as adenocarcinomas of other histogenetic origin. Of 73 fatal carcinomas, ductular carcinomas accounted for 48 fatalities (65.8%), whereas other adenocarcinomas accounted for only 20 fatalities (27.4%). Radiation had no effect on this ratio. Ductular carcinomas also had a higher rate of metastasis than did adenocarcinomas. Existing classifications of mammary carcinomas do not recognize the characteristic morphologic features, the degree of malignancy, and the prognostic importance of these ductular carcinomas. Metastasis rates did not differ between simple and complex carcinomas or between those lesions and adenocarcinomas in mixed tumors. True carcinosarcomas metastasized more frequently (100%, or 5/5) than did adenocarcinomas in mixed tumors (34.4%, or 22/64), emphasizing the importance of not lumping these tumors under the classification of malignant mixed tumors.

Journal

Veterinary PathologySAGE

Published: Sep 1, 1999

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