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Control of Autofluorescence of Archival Formaldehyde-fixed, Paraffin-embedded Tissue in Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM)

Control of Autofluorescence of Archival Formaldehyde-fixed, Paraffin-embedded Tissue in Confocal... Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) offers the advantage of quasi-theoretical resolution due to absence of interference with out-of-focus light. Prerequisites include minimal tissue autofluorescence, either intrinsic or induced by fixation and tissue processing, and minimal background fluorescence due to nonspecific binding of the fluorescent label. To eliminate or reduce autofluorescence, three different reagents, ammonia-ethanol, sodium borohydride, and Sudan Black B were tested on paraffin sections of archival formaldehyde-fixed tissue. Paraffin sections of biopsy specimens of human bone marrow, myocardium, and of bovine cartilage were compared by CLSM at 488-nm, 568-nm and 647-nm wavelengths with bone marrow frozen sections fixed either with formaldehyde or with glutaraldehyde. Autofluorescence of untreated sections related to both the specific type of tissue and to the tissue processing technique, including fixation. The reagents' effects also depended on the type of tissue and technique of tissue processing, including fixation, and so did the efficiency of the reagents tested. Therefore, no general recipe for the control of autofluorescence could be delineated. Ammonia-ethanol proved most efficient in archival bone marrow sections. Sudan Black B performed best on myocardium, and the combination of all three reagents proved most efficient on paraffin sections of cartilage and on frozen sections fixed in formaldehyde or glutaraldehyde. Sodium borohydride was required for the reduction of unwanted fluorescence in glutaraldehyde-fixed tissue. In formaldehyde-fixed tissue, however, sodium borohydride induced brilliant autofluorescence in erythrocytes that otherwise remained inconspicuous. Ammonia-ethanol is believed to reduce autofluorescence by improving the extraction of fluorescent molecules and by inactivating pH-sensitive fluorochromes. The efficiency of borohydride is related to its capacity of reducing aldehyde and keto-groups, thus changing the fluorescence of tissue constituents and especially of glutaraldehyde-derived condensates. Sudan Black B is suggested to mask fluorescent tissue components. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Histochemistry & Cytochemistry SAGE

Control of Autofluorescence of Archival Formaldehyde-fixed, Paraffin-embedded Tissue in Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM)

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References (23)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2001 Authors
ISSN
0022-1554
eISSN
1551-5044
DOI
10.1177/002215540104901210
pmid
11724904
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) offers the advantage of quasi-theoretical resolution due to absence of interference with out-of-focus light. Prerequisites include minimal tissue autofluorescence, either intrinsic or induced by fixation and tissue processing, and minimal background fluorescence due to nonspecific binding of the fluorescent label. To eliminate or reduce autofluorescence, three different reagents, ammonia-ethanol, sodium borohydride, and Sudan Black B were tested on paraffin sections of archival formaldehyde-fixed tissue. Paraffin sections of biopsy specimens of human bone marrow, myocardium, and of bovine cartilage were compared by CLSM at 488-nm, 568-nm and 647-nm wavelengths with bone marrow frozen sections fixed either with formaldehyde or with glutaraldehyde. Autofluorescence of untreated sections related to both the specific type of tissue and to the tissue processing technique, including fixation. The reagents' effects also depended on the type of tissue and technique of tissue processing, including fixation, and so did the efficiency of the reagents tested. Therefore, no general recipe for the control of autofluorescence could be delineated. Ammonia-ethanol proved most efficient in archival bone marrow sections. Sudan Black B performed best on myocardium, and the combination of all three reagents proved most efficient on paraffin sections of cartilage and on frozen sections fixed in formaldehyde or glutaraldehyde. Sodium borohydride was required for the reduction of unwanted fluorescence in glutaraldehyde-fixed tissue. In formaldehyde-fixed tissue, however, sodium borohydride induced brilliant autofluorescence in erythrocytes that otherwise remained inconspicuous. Ammonia-ethanol is believed to reduce autofluorescence by improving the extraction of fluorescent molecules and by inactivating pH-sensitive fluorochromes. The efficiency of borohydride is related to its capacity of reducing aldehyde and keto-groups, thus changing the fluorescence of tissue constituents and especially of glutaraldehyde-derived condensates. Sudan Black B is suggested to mask fluorescent tissue components.

Journal

Journal of Histochemistry & CytochemistrySAGE

Published: Dec 1, 2001

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