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Cultural Images and the Health of African American Women

Cultural Images and the Health of African American Women From the SWS President CULTURAL IMAGES AND THE HEALTH OF AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN SHIRLEY A. HILL University of Kansas Keywords: health; medical; race, class; gender; practice; applied; policy he CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) recently Treleased a report titled Health, United States, 2008 (CDC, 2009) that offers a wealth of statistical data on health trends and provides a great resource for Sociologists for Women in Society (SWS) in its health policy initiative. It confirms that our profit-driven health care system needs to be reformed: Health care costs have skyrocketed, yet access to care has declined and health outcomes (e.g., life spans) lag behind those in many other countries. We spend $2.1 trillion yearly on health care—an average of $7,026 per person—yet 43.1 million people are without health care coverage, and the average life span of Americans is shorter than for those who live in comparable nations. The second fact easily discernable from the CDC data is that social inequalities shape access to health care, health status, and life spans. Overall, whites are more likely than racial minori- ties to have access to health care (CDC 2002, 454) and live longer lives. Gender also matters: Because of their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Gender & Society SAGE

Cultural Images and the Health of African American Women

Gender & Society , Volume 23 (6): 14 – Dec 1, 2009

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References (52)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2009 Sociologists for Women in Society
ISSN
0891-2432
eISSN
1552-3977
DOI
10.1177/0891243209346308
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

From the SWS President CULTURAL IMAGES AND THE HEALTH OF AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN SHIRLEY A. HILL University of Kansas Keywords: health; medical; race, class; gender; practice; applied; policy he CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) recently Treleased a report titled Health, United States, 2008 (CDC, 2009) that offers a wealth of statistical data on health trends and provides a great resource for Sociologists for Women in Society (SWS) in its health policy initiative. It confirms that our profit-driven health care system needs to be reformed: Health care costs have skyrocketed, yet access to care has declined and health outcomes (e.g., life spans) lag behind those in many other countries. We spend $2.1 trillion yearly on health care—an average of $7,026 per person—yet 43.1 million people are without health care coverage, and the average life span of Americans is shorter than for those who live in comparable nations. The second fact easily discernable from the CDC data is that social inequalities shape access to health care, health status, and life spans. Overall, whites are more likely than racial minori- ties to have access to health care (CDC 2002, 454) and live longer lives. Gender also matters: Because of their

Journal

Gender & SocietySAGE

Published: Dec 1, 2009

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