Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Does Length of Questionnaire Matter? A Randomised Trial of Response Rates to a Mailed Questionnaire

Does Length of Questionnaire Matter? A Randomised Trial of Response Rates to a Mailed Questionnaire Objective:To assess whether length of questionnaire affects response rates.Methods:A quasi-randomised trial of women aged 70 years and over in a general practice in England. Three questionnaires of different lengths: a clinical questionnaire (four pages); the same questionnaire plus the EuroQol (five pages); the same questionnaire plus the SF-12 (seven pages). The impact of length on the proportion of returned questionnaires and item completion rates was assessed.Results:In total, 847 questionnaires were mailed; response rates were 49%, 49% and 40% to the short, medium and long questionnaires, respectively. This difference was statistically significant when the short questionnaire was compared against the longest instrument (9% difference; 95% confidence interval (CI) of difference=0.3% to 16.6%). Item completion rates for the clinical questionnaire did not differ. Respondents did not differ in age or self-reported health status between the three groups.Conclusions:Increasing the length of a questionnaire from five to seven pages reduces response rates from women aged 70 years and over. However, lengthening a questionnaire does not seem to affect the quality of responses to questions near the front of the questionnaire. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Health Services Research & Policy SAGE

Does Length of Questionnaire Matter? A Randomised Trial of Response Rates to a Mailed Questionnaire

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/does-length-of-questionnaire-matter-a-randomised-trial-of-response-jaufBd5bXi

References (10)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2000 SAGE Publications
ISSN
1355-8196
eISSN
1758-1060
DOI
10.1177/135581960000500406
pmid
11184958
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective:To assess whether length of questionnaire affects response rates.Methods:A quasi-randomised trial of women aged 70 years and over in a general practice in England. Three questionnaires of different lengths: a clinical questionnaire (four pages); the same questionnaire plus the EuroQol (five pages); the same questionnaire plus the SF-12 (seven pages). The impact of length on the proportion of returned questionnaires and item completion rates was assessed.Results:In total, 847 questionnaires were mailed; response rates were 49%, 49% and 40% to the short, medium and long questionnaires, respectively. This difference was statistically significant when the short questionnaire was compared against the longest instrument (9% difference; 95% confidence interval (CI) of difference=0.3% to 16.6%). Item completion rates for the clinical questionnaire did not differ. Respondents did not differ in age or self-reported health status between the three groups.Conclusions:Increasing the length of a questionnaire from five to seven pages reduces response rates from women aged 70 years and over. However, lengthening a questionnaire does not seem to affect the quality of responses to questions near the front of the questionnaire.

Journal

Journal of Health Services Research & PolicySAGE

Published: Oct 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.