Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Does Provision of Food in School Increase Girls' Enrollment? Evidence from Schools in Sub-Saharan Africa

Does Provision of Food in School Increase Girls' Enrollment? Evidence from Schools in Sub-Saharan... BackgroundThe problem of low female literacy rates in Africa starts with low primary school enrollment, particularly in areas of high food insecurity. The provision of food in, and through, schools is considered to be one way of enrolling more girls in school, keeping them enrolled, and enhancing their adult well-being and pro- ductivity as a result.ObjectiveTo investigate the effects of provision of food and additional take-home rations in schools on girls' enrollment.MethodsA retrospective cross-sectional study was designed based on school-level surveys in 32 African countries between 2002 and 2005. The study population consisted of girls and boys in primary schools targeted by the World Food Programme (WFP) and located in food-insecure areas that also suffered from lack of access to education.ResultsProvision of food in schools through the Food for Education (FFE) program contributed to increasing absolute enrollment in WFP-assisted schools by 28% for girls and 22% for boys in the first year. Post year-one enrollment patterns varied according to the type of FFE program. Where provision of take-home rations for girls was combined with on-site feeding for all pupils, the increase in girls' absolute enrollment was sustained at 30% after the first year. However, in schools providing on-site feeding alone, the rate of increase in absolute enrollment after the first year reverted to the rates of increase found in the year prior to FFE implementation. The provision of take-home rations also appeared to reduce the dropout rate of female students, particularly in the higher grades.ConclusionsFFE programs can have a lasting positive influence on school enrollment and, by providing extra take-home rations to girls, in addition to on-site feeding, can make a strong contribution to the Millennium Development Goals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food and Nutrition Bulletin SAGE

Does Provision of Food in School Increase Girls' Enrollment? Evidence from Schools in Sub-Saharan Africa

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/does-provision-of-food-in-school-increase-girls-enrollment-evidence-jX5BYFJE9z

References (14)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2007 Nevin Scrimshaw International Nutrition Foundation
ISSN
0379-5721
eISSN
1564-8265
DOI
10.1177/156482650702800203
pmid
24683673
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BackgroundThe problem of low female literacy rates in Africa starts with low primary school enrollment, particularly in areas of high food insecurity. The provision of food in, and through, schools is considered to be one way of enrolling more girls in school, keeping them enrolled, and enhancing their adult well-being and pro- ductivity as a result.ObjectiveTo investigate the effects of provision of food and additional take-home rations in schools on girls' enrollment.MethodsA retrospective cross-sectional study was designed based on school-level surveys in 32 African countries between 2002 and 2005. The study population consisted of girls and boys in primary schools targeted by the World Food Programme (WFP) and located in food-insecure areas that also suffered from lack of access to education.ResultsProvision of food in schools through the Food for Education (FFE) program contributed to increasing absolute enrollment in WFP-assisted schools by 28% for girls and 22% for boys in the first year. Post year-one enrollment patterns varied according to the type of FFE program. Where provision of take-home rations for girls was combined with on-site feeding for all pupils, the increase in girls' absolute enrollment was sustained at 30% after the first year. However, in schools providing on-site feeding alone, the rate of increase in absolute enrollment after the first year reverted to the rates of increase found in the year prior to FFE implementation. The provision of take-home rations also appeared to reduce the dropout rate of female students, particularly in the higher grades.ConclusionsFFE programs can have a lasting positive influence on school enrollment and, by providing extra take-home rations to girls, in addition to on-site feeding, can make a strong contribution to the Millennium Development Goals.

Journal

Food and Nutrition BulletinSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.