Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Don’t Mind Meat? The Denial of Mind to Animals Used for Human Consumption

Don’t Mind Meat? The Denial of Mind to Animals Used for Human Consumption Many people like eating meat, but most are reluctant to harm things that have minds. The current three studies show that this dissonance motivates people to deny minds to animals. Study 1 demonstrates that animals considered appropriate for human consumption are ascribed diminished mental capacities. Study 2 shows that meat eaters are motivated to deny minds to food animals when they are reminded of the link between meat and animal suffering. Finally, Study 3 provides direct support for our dissonance hypothesis, showing that expectations regarding the immediate consumption of meat increase mind denial. Moreover, this mind denial in turn reduces negative affect associated with dissonance. The findings highlight the role of dissonance reduction in facilitating the practice of meat eating and protecting cultural commitments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin SAGE

Don’t Mind Meat? The Denial of Mind to Animals Used for Human Consumption

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/don-t-mind-meat-the-denial-of-mind-to-animals-used-for-human-Y01jHSYBKU

References (56)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2012 Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.
ISSN
0146-1672
eISSN
1552-7433
DOI
10.1177/0146167211424291
pmid
21980158
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many people like eating meat, but most are reluctant to harm things that have minds. The current three studies show that this dissonance motivates people to deny minds to animals. Study 1 demonstrates that animals considered appropriate for human consumption are ascribed diminished mental capacities. Study 2 shows that meat eaters are motivated to deny minds to food animals when they are reminded of the link between meat and animal suffering. Finally, Study 3 provides direct support for our dissonance hypothesis, showing that expectations regarding the immediate consumption of meat increase mind denial. Moreover, this mind denial in turn reduces negative affect associated with dissonance. The findings highlight the role of dissonance reduction in facilitating the practice of meat eating and protecting cultural commitments.

Journal

Personality and Social Psychology BulletinSAGE

Published: Feb 1, 2012

There are no references for this article.