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Editor's Notes

Editor's Notes ATR/97.1 For more than a decade I have been part of an ongoing commu- nity of Jewish and Christian clergy and laity in Metro Vancouver who gather to discuss both theological and political questions. We do not always agree and we are not as diverse a group as I would like us to be, but I love the questions we ask and the passion with which we share our thoughtful and sometimes not so thoughtful observations. One of the potentially heretical observations that I have been led to is this: What if Christian attitudes toward the apostolic writings we call the New Testament resembled Jewish attitudes to those authori- tative writings known as the Mishnah and Talmud? In other words, what if we realized, as did the apostolic writers, that the “scriptures” meant what we Christians know as the Hebrew scriptures? Could we engage Judaism in a different fashion if we read the New Testament as halakah, the way of walking with the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as this God is revealed to us in Jesus of Nazareth? As a retired professor of liturgical studies and a practicing parish priest, I continue to be both astounded and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anglican Theological Review SAGE

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2015 Anglican Theological Review Corporation
ISSN
0003-3286
eISSN
2163-6214
DOI
10.1177/000332861509700101
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ATR/97.1 For more than a decade I have been part of an ongoing commu- nity of Jewish and Christian clergy and laity in Metro Vancouver who gather to discuss both theological and political questions. We do not always agree and we are not as diverse a group as I would like us to be, but I love the questions we ask and the passion with which we share our thoughtful and sometimes not so thoughtful observations. One of the potentially heretical observations that I have been led to is this: What if Christian attitudes toward the apostolic writings we call the New Testament resembled Jewish attitudes to those authori- tative writings known as the Mishnah and Talmud? In other words, what if we realized, as did the apostolic writers, that the “scriptures” meant what we Christians know as the Hebrew scriptures? Could we engage Judaism in a different fashion if we read the New Testament as halakah, the way of walking with the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as this God is revealed to us in Jesus of Nazareth? As a retired professor of liturgical studies and a practicing parish priest, I continue to be both astounded and

Journal

Anglican Theological ReviewSAGE

Published: Aug 16, 2021

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