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Effects of Gender, Ethnicity, and Medical Illness on Drinking Cessation in Older Primary Care Patients

Effects of Gender, Ethnicity, and Medical Illness on Drinking Cessation in Older Primary Care... Objective: This study examined the effects of gender, ethnicity, and medical illness on cessation of alcohol consumption in late life by analyzing characteristics that distinguish current drinkers from former drinkers. Method: Participants were 211 medical patients aged 55 to 91 years, recruited from four urban public sector primary care clinics. Respondents completed the Short Michigan Alcohol Screening Test and provided health and demographic data. A subset (n = 139) reported drinking history. Of these participants, 40% reported cessation of alcohol consumption at least 1 year prior to their participation in the study. Results: Older age, hypertension, and heart problems were associated with drinking cessation among women but not among men. In a logistic regression model, drinking cessation was predicted by being unmarried, being a member of an ethnic minority group, heart problems, and diabetes. Discussion: Physical illnesses may contribute to drinking cessation, especially in older women. Results have implications for alcohol interventions with older adults. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aging and Health SAGE

Effects of Gender, Ethnicity, and Medical Illness on Drinking Cessation in Older Primary Care Patients

Journal of Aging and Health , Volume 17 (1): 15 – Feb 1, 2005

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References (33)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0898-2643
eISSN
1552-6887
DOI
10.1177/0898264304272785
pmid
15601784
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the effects of gender, ethnicity, and medical illness on cessation of alcohol consumption in late life by analyzing characteristics that distinguish current drinkers from former drinkers. Method: Participants were 211 medical patients aged 55 to 91 years, recruited from four urban public sector primary care clinics. Respondents completed the Short Michigan Alcohol Screening Test and provided health and demographic data. A subset (n = 139) reported drinking history. Of these participants, 40% reported cessation of alcohol consumption at least 1 year prior to their participation in the study. Results: Older age, hypertension, and heart problems were associated with drinking cessation among women but not among men. In a logistic regression model, drinking cessation was predicted by being unmarried, being a member of an ethnic minority group, heart problems, and diabetes. Discussion: Physical illnesses may contribute to drinking cessation, especially in older women. Results have implications for alcohol interventions with older adults.

Journal

Journal of Aging and HealthSAGE

Published: Feb 1, 2005

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