Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Feminizing hormone therapy in a Canadian cohort of transgender women with and without HIV

Feminizing hormone therapy in a Canadian cohort of transgender women with and without HIV BackgroundPotential bidirectional drug–drug interactions between feminizing hormone therapy (FHT) and antiretroviral therapy (ART) are of concern for trans women with HIV and their healthcare providers. This study aimed to characterize patterns of FHT and ART among trans women with HIV and to compare serum hormone levels to trans women without HIV.MethodsCharts of trans women were reviewed at seven HIV primary care or endocrinology clinics in Toronto and Montreal from 2018 to 2019. ART regimens, FHT use, serum estradiol, and serum testosterone levels were compared on the basis of HIV status (positive, negative, missing/unknown).ResultsOf 1495 trans women, there were 86 trans women with HIV, of whom 79 (91.8%) were on ART. ART regimens were most commonly integrase inhibitor-based (67.4%), many boosted with ritonavir or cobicistat (45.3%). Fewer (71.8%) trans women with HIV were prescribed FHT, compared to those without HIV (88.4%) and those with missing/unknown status (90.2%, p < 0.001). Among trans women on FHT with recorded serum estradiol (n = 1153), there was no statistical difference in serum estradiol between those with HIV (median: 203 pmol/L, IQR: 95.5, 417.5) and those with negative (200 mol/L [113, 407]) or missing/unknown HIV status (227 pmol/L [127.5, 384.5) (p = 0.633). Serum testosterone concentrations were also similar between groups.ConclusionsIn this cohort, trans women with HIV were prescribed FHT less often than trans women with negative or unknown HIV status. There was no difference in serum estradiol or testosterone levels of trans women on FHT regardless of HIV status, providing reassurance regarding potential drug–drug interactions between FHT and ART. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Antiviral Therapy SAGE

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/feminizing-hormone-therapy-in-a-canadian-cohort-of-transgender-women-YWoIcG1Pir

References (31)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2023
ISSN
1359-6535
eISSN
2040-2058
DOI
10.1177/13596535231182505
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BackgroundPotential bidirectional drug–drug interactions between feminizing hormone therapy (FHT) and antiretroviral therapy (ART) are of concern for trans women with HIV and their healthcare providers. This study aimed to characterize patterns of FHT and ART among trans women with HIV and to compare serum hormone levels to trans women without HIV.MethodsCharts of trans women were reviewed at seven HIV primary care or endocrinology clinics in Toronto and Montreal from 2018 to 2019. ART regimens, FHT use, serum estradiol, and serum testosterone levels were compared on the basis of HIV status (positive, negative, missing/unknown).ResultsOf 1495 trans women, there were 86 trans women with HIV, of whom 79 (91.8%) were on ART. ART regimens were most commonly integrase inhibitor-based (67.4%), many boosted with ritonavir or cobicistat (45.3%). Fewer (71.8%) trans women with HIV were prescribed FHT, compared to those without HIV (88.4%) and those with missing/unknown status (90.2%, p < 0.001). Among trans women on FHT with recorded serum estradiol (n = 1153), there was no statistical difference in serum estradiol between those with HIV (median: 203 pmol/L, IQR: 95.5, 417.5) and those with negative (200 mol/L [113, 407]) or missing/unknown HIV status (227 pmol/L [127.5, 384.5) (p = 0.633). Serum testosterone concentrations were also similar between groups.ConclusionsIn this cohort, trans women with HIV were prescribed FHT less often than trans women with negative or unknown HIV status. There was no difference in serum estradiol or testosterone levels of trans women on FHT regardless of HIV status, providing reassurance regarding potential drug–drug interactions between FHT and ART.

Journal

Antiviral TherapySAGE

Published: Jun 8, 2023

Keywords: transgender; antiretroviral therapy; pharmacokinetics; drug interactions; estradiol; anti-androgen

There are no references for this article.