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Flying to Jerusalem over the Years1

Flying to Jerusalem over the Years1 Dateline MEI Contemporary Review Flying to Jerusalem over of the Middle East 9(2) 135 –137, 2022 the Years © The Author(s) 2022 Reprints and permissions: https://doi.org/10.1177/23477989221082441 in.sagepub.com/journals- permissions-india DOI: 10.1177/23477989221082441 journals.sagepub.com/home/cme I was flying to Jerusalem. It was my maiden flight. I was going to Israel for a 3-month field trip; what a luxury! These days, financial constraints considerably reduce the Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU)-sponsored field visits to a week or 10 days. The support in those pre-economic reform eras came with US$25 per diem, along with international tickets. While the university committee approved my field trip in May 1987, procedural issues, RBI clearance, and budgetary process delayed it by a year. Finally, the trip was set for the mid-1988, a few months after the outbreak of the first Palestinian intifada. But there was a catch. Since tickets were state paid, one could fly only by Air India or on tickets issued by it. Planning the itinerary was horrendous. Jerusalem has no international airport, and its small airport was not accepting international flights. So, one has to land at Ben Gurion Airport near Tel Aviv, about 60 km from Jerusalem (the relatively shorter Route 1 between Jerusalem and Tel http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Review of the Middle East SAGE

Flying to Jerusalem over the Years1

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2022 SAGE Publications
ISSN
2347-7989
eISSN
2349-0055
DOI
10.1177/23477989221082441
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dateline MEI Contemporary Review Flying to Jerusalem over of the Middle East 9(2) 135 –137, 2022 the Years © The Author(s) 2022 Reprints and permissions: https://doi.org/10.1177/23477989221082441 in.sagepub.com/journals- permissions-india DOI: 10.1177/23477989221082441 journals.sagepub.com/home/cme I was flying to Jerusalem. It was my maiden flight. I was going to Israel for a 3-month field trip; what a luxury! These days, financial constraints considerably reduce the Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU)-sponsored field visits to a week or 10 days. The support in those pre-economic reform eras came with US$25 per diem, along with international tickets. While the university committee approved my field trip in May 1987, procedural issues, RBI clearance, and budgetary process delayed it by a year. Finally, the trip was set for the mid-1988, a few months after the outbreak of the first Palestinian intifada. But there was a catch. Since tickets were state paid, one could fly only by Air India or on tickets issued by it. Planning the itinerary was horrendous. Jerusalem has no international airport, and its small airport was not accepting international flights. So, one has to land at Ben Gurion Airport near Tel Aviv, about 60 km from Jerusalem (the relatively shorter Route 1 between Jerusalem and Tel

Journal

Contemporary Review of the Middle EastSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2022

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