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Gap on the Map? Towards a Geography of Consumption and Identity

Gap on the Map? Towards a Geography of Consumption and Identity The current blurring of the boundaries between economic, cultural, and social geography has placed issues of consumption and identity firmly on the research agenda. In this paper, we address the question of the spatiality of retailing and consumption and argue that emergent microgeographies of consumption are challenging the simplicity of the globalisation thesis. We argue that retailers are in the business of creating particular urban landscapes and that qualitative differences are emerging between areas as consumption centres. By focusing on the spatial outcomes of the complex mediation between retailers, advertisers, and consumers, we examine the complex political-economic relations which enable the production of consumption. The project is thus an attempt to mesh production-oriented and culturally derived understandings of consumption and identity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environment and Planning A SAGE

Gap on the Map? Towards a Geography of Consumption and Identity

Environment and Planning A , Volume 27 (12): 22 – Dec 1, 1995

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References (55)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1995 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0308-518X
eISSN
1472-3409
DOI
10.1068/a271877
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The current blurring of the boundaries between economic, cultural, and social geography has placed issues of consumption and identity firmly on the research agenda. In this paper, we address the question of the spatiality of retailing and consumption and argue that emergent microgeographies of consumption are challenging the simplicity of the globalisation thesis. We argue that retailers are in the business of creating particular urban landscapes and that qualitative differences are emerging between areas as consumption centres. By focusing on the spatial outcomes of the complex mediation between retailers, advertisers, and consumers, we examine the complex political-economic relations which enable the production of consumption. The project is thus an attempt to mesh production-oriented and culturally derived understandings of consumption and identity.

Journal

Environment and Planning ASAGE

Published: Dec 1, 1995

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