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Generational Changes in Gender-Role Attitudes: Britain in a Cross-National Perspective

Generational Changes in Gender-Role Attitudes: Britain in a Cross-National Perspective This paper compares the nature and extent of change in gender-role attitudes in Britain with other nations. We hypothesise that while many of the changes would be similar across nations reflecting, in part, the increased importance of women's labour-force participation, the pace and sources of attitudinal change would be different in the different nations. Comparisons are made over the last decade between Britain, the United States and Germany. Using data from the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) additional comparisons over a shorter time period are made with Ireland, the Netherlands and Italy. Data from the General Social Surveys of America (GSS) and Germany (ALLBUS) reveal that there has been a marked liberal shift in attitudes, with more of the change occurring within cohorts than through the process of cohort succession. In Britain, data from the British Social Attitudes surveys (BSA) reveal a slower and less consistent pace of change, with evidence of a growing gender difference in beliefs that maternal employment may be harmful to children. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sociology SAGE

Generational Changes in Gender-Role Attitudes: Britain in a Cross-National Perspective

Sociology , Volume 30 (3): 22 – Aug 1, 1996

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References (14)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0038-0385
eISSN
1469-8684
DOI
10.1177/0038038596030003004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper compares the nature and extent of change in gender-role attitudes in Britain with other nations. We hypothesise that while many of the changes would be similar across nations reflecting, in part, the increased importance of women's labour-force participation, the pace and sources of attitudinal change would be different in the different nations. Comparisons are made over the last decade between Britain, the United States and Germany. Using data from the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) additional comparisons over a shorter time period are made with Ireland, the Netherlands and Italy. Data from the General Social Surveys of America (GSS) and Germany (ALLBUS) reveal that there has been a marked liberal shift in attitudes, with more of the change occurring within cohorts than through the process of cohort succession. In Britain, data from the British Social Attitudes surveys (BSA) reveal a slower and less consistent pace of change, with evidence of a growing gender difference in beliefs that maternal employment may be harmful to children.

Journal

SociologySAGE

Published: Aug 1, 1996

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