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Geography and gender: home, again?

Geography and gender: home, again? Progress in Human Geography 22,2 (1998) pp. 276±282 Geography and gender: home, again? Mona Domosh College of Liberal Arts, Florida Atlantic University, 2912 College Avenue, Davie, Florida 33314, USA The spaces many of us hold close, because so meaningful and dear, are those of home ± of the homes we were raised in, the ones we abandoned, the ones we live in. In Sandra Buckley's (1996: 441) guided tour of Japanese life, the protagonist of the novel Kitchen states `I think the place I love the most in the world is the kitchen'. Perhaps it is because these spaces are so meaningful, so complex and so close that we tend to keep our distance from them in our research. But perhaps too it is that until recently geography and geographers did not move past the front stoop (but see Loyd, 1975; 1981; Seager, 1987). To do so would be to move out of the realm of social science research as defined, and into the world of humanities, of emotions and meanings. Yet integral to feminist analyses have been the unmasking of biases that have directed fields of study, a reshap- ing of the contours of acceptable objects and subjects http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Progress in Human Geography SAGE

Geography and gender: home, again?

Progress in Human Geography , Volume 22 (2): 7 – Apr 1, 1998

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References (20)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0309-1325
eISSN
1477-0288
DOI
10.1191/030913298676121192
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Progress in Human Geography 22,2 (1998) pp. 276±282 Geography and gender: home, again? Mona Domosh College of Liberal Arts, Florida Atlantic University, 2912 College Avenue, Davie, Florida 33314, USA The spaces many of us hold close, because so meaningful and dear, are those of home ± of the homes we were raised in, the ones we abandoned, the ones we live in. In Sandra Buckley's (1996: 441) guided tour of Japanese life, the protagonist of the novel Kitchen states `I think the place I love the most in the world is the kitchen'. Perhaps it is because these spaces are so meaningful, so complex and so close that we tend to keep our distance from them in our research. But perhaps too it is that until recently geography and geographers did not move past the front stoop (but see Loyd, 1975; 1981; Seager, 1987). To do so would be to move out of the realm of social science research as defined, and into the world of humanities, of emotions and meanings. Yet integral to feminist analyses have been the unmasking of biases that have directed fields of study, a reshap- ing of the contours of acceptable objects and subjects

Journal

Progress in Human GeographySAGE

Published: Apr 1, 1998

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