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Global hunting grounds: power, scale and ecology in the negotiation of conservation

Global hunting grounds: power, scale and ecology in the negotiation of conservation Increasingly, large international conservation organizations have come to rely uponmarket-oriented interventions, such as sport trophy hunting, to achieve multiplegoals of biodiversity protection and ‘development’. Suchinitiatives apply an understanding of ‘nature’-defined throughan emerging discourse of global ecology-to incorporate local ecologies within thematerial organizational sphere of capital and transnational institutions, generatingnew forms of governmentality at scales inaccessible to traditional means ofdiscipline such as legislation and enforcement. In this paper, I historicize debatesover ‘nature’ in a region of northern Pakistan, and demonstratehow local ecologies are becoming subject to transnational institutional agentsthrough strategies similar to those used by colonial administrators to gainecological control over their ‘dominions’. This contemporaryreworking of a colonialist ethic of conservation relies rhetorically on a discourseof global ecology, and on ideological representations of a resident population asincapable environmental managers, to assert and implement an allegedlyscientifically and ethically superior force better able to respond to assumeddegradation. In undertaking such disciplinary projects, international conservationorganizations rely on, and produce, a representation of ecological space as‘global’ to facilitate the attainment of translocalpolitical-ecological goals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cultural Geographies SAGE

Global hunting grounds: power, scale and ecology in the negotiation of conservation

Cultural Geographies , Volume 12 (3): 33 – Jul 1, 2005

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References (52)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1474-4740
eISSN
1477-0881
DOI
10.1191/1474474005eu330oa
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Increasingly, large international conservation organizations have come to rely uponmarket-oriented interventions, such as sport trophy hunting, to achieve multiplegoals of biodiversity protection and ‘development’. Suchinitiatives apply an understanding of ‘nature’-defined throughan emerging discourse of global ecology-to incorporate local ecologies within thematerial organizational sphere of capital and transnational institutions, generatingnew forms of governmentality at scales inaccessible to traditional means ofdiscipline such as legislation and enforcement. In this paper, I historicize debatesover ‘nature’ in a region of northern Pakistan, and demonstratehow local ecologies are becoming subject to transnational institutional agentsthrough strategies similar to those used by colonial administrators to gainecological control over their ‘dominions’. This contemporaryreworking of a colonialist ethic of conservation relies rhetorically on a discourseof global ecology, and on ideological representations of a resident population asincapable environmental managers, to assert and implement an allegedlyscientifically and ethically superior force better able to respond to assumeddegradation. In undertaking such disciplinary projects, international conservationorganizations rely on, and produce, a representation of ecological space as‘global’ to facilitate the attainment of translocalpolitical-ecological goals.

Journal

Cultural GeographiesSAGE

Published: Jul 1, 2005

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