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How Psychoanalysis Lost the Birthing Body

How Psychoanalysis Lost the Birthing Body j a a 690442 APAXXX10.1177/0003065117690442nancy J. chodorowCommentary on Balsam research-article2017 Nancy J. Chodorow 65/1 How PsycHoanalysis l ost tHe BirtHing Body: commentary on Balsam n 2012 Rosemary Balsam gave a plenary address, “(Re)membering I the Female Body in Psychoanalysis: Childbirth,” at the American Psychoanalytic Association meetings (Balsam 2013). Presented the same year in which her pathbreaking book, Women’s Bodies in Psychoanalysis, appeared, that plenary extended the more contemporary clinical and theoretical investigations of Women’s Bodies back into the history of psychoanalysis. Balsam excavated the writings of early women analysts like Margarete Hilferding, showing how from the earliest time in our his- tory thinking about childbirth and the pregnant, fertile body, whether clinical or theoretical, was silenced. Indeed, as Balsam radically sug- gested, thinking about such matters can be found in the theories of sev- eral figures who were marginalized or altogether excluded: Hilferding herself; Jung, with his great mother; Rank, with the trauma of birth. Fertile, childbearing women and childbirth, apparently, had no place in the psychosexual theory! Balsam’s historical investigations were fol- lowed by clinical vignettes so moving that by the time she had finished many women in the audience were crying. Balsam is one of a very http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association SAGE

How Psychoanalysis Lost the Birthing Body

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References (34)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2017 by the American Psychoanalytic Association
ISSN
0003-0651
eISSN
1941-2460
DOI
10.1177/0003065117690442
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

j a a 690442 APAXXX10.1177/0003065117690442nancy J. chodorowCommentary on Balsam research-article2017 Nancy J. Chodorow 65/1 How PsycHoanalysis l ost tHe BirtHing Body: commentary on Balsam n 2012 Rosemary Balsam gave a plenary address, “(Re)membering I the Female Body in Psychoanalysis: Childbirth,” at the American Psychoanalytic Association meetings (Balsam 2013). Presented the same year in which her pathbreaking book, Women’s Bodies in Psychoanalysis, appeared, that plenary extended the more contemporary clinical and theoretical investigations of Women’s Bodies back into the history of psychoanalysis. Balsam excavated the writings of early women analysts like Margarete Hilferding, showing how from the earliest time in our his- tory thinking about childbirth and the pregnant, fertile body, whether clinical or theoretical, was silenced. Indeed, as Balsam radically sug- gested, thinking about such matters can be found in the theories of sev- eral figures who were marginalized or altogether excluded: Hilferding herself; Jung, with his great mother; Rank, with the trauma of birth. Fertile, childbearing women and childbirth, apparently, had no place in the psychosexual theory! Balsam’s historical investigations were fol- lowed by clinical vignettes so moving that by the time she had finished many women in the audience were crying. Balsam is one of a very

Journal

Journal of the American Psychoanalytic AssociationSAGE

Published: Feb 1, 2017

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