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How Selfish Are Self-Expression Values? A Civicness Test

How Selfish Are Self-Expression Values? A Civicness Test Various analyses of World Values Survey data find a syndrome of emancipative orientations, mostly known as “self-expression values,” on the rise throughout all countries with longitudinal evidence. But, as much as scholarship agrees on the rise of self-expression values, there is disagreement on whether these values are civic or uncivic in character. Some declare self-expression values uncivic because they see them as indicative of egoism and weak social capital. Others consider self-expression values as civic for the opposite reasons. They interpret them as a sign of altruism and strong social capital. Cross-cultural evidence from the World Values Surveys supports the civic view on both accounts. First, in a Schwartz value space, self-expression values are associated with altruism, especially at high levels of self-expression values. Second, in a social capital space, self-expression values go together with trust in people and peaceful collective action. The findings qualify self-expression values as a civic form of modern individualism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology SAGE

How Selfish Are Self-Expression Values? A Civicness Test

Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology , Volume 41 (2): 23 – Mar 1, 2010

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References (30)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2010
ISSN
0022-0221
eISSN
1552-5422
DOI
10.1177/0022022109354378
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Various analyses of World Values Survey data find a syndrome of emancipative orientations, mostly known as “self-expression values,” on the rise throughout all countries with longitudinal evidence. But, as much as scholarship agrees on the rise of self-expression values, there is disagreement on whether these values are civic or uncivic in character. Some declare self-expression values uncivic because they see them as indicative of egoism and weak social capital. Others consider self-expression values as civic for the opposite reasons. They interpret them as a sign of altruism and strong social capital. Cross-cultural evidence from the World Values Surveys supports the civic view on both accounts. First, in a Schwartz value space, self-expression values are associated with altruism, especially at high levels of self-expression values. Second, in a social capital space, self-expression values go together with trust in people and peaceful collective action. The findings qualify self-expression values as a civic form of modern individualism.

Journal

Journal of Cross-Cultural PsychologySAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2010

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