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Immobility, Battles, and the Journey of Feeling Alive

Immobility, Battles, and the Journey of Feeling Alive Australian mental health services have responded to the problem of depression by adopting an early intervention and recovery orientation. Using qualitative research conducted in Australia with 80 women aged 20 to 75 years, we examine how participants invoked particular metaphors to construct meaning about the gendered experience of depression and recovery. We argue that women’s stories of recovery provide a rich source of interpretive material to consider the everyday metaphors of recovery beyond clinical notions and linear models of personal change. We identified key metaphors women drew on to articulate the struggle of self-transformation through depression and recovery: the immobilizing effect of depression, recovery as a battle to control depression, and recovery as a journey of self-knowledge. Our findings might be useful for mental health professionals in a range of clinical contexts to reflect on the power of language for shaping how women interpret their experiences of recovery from depression. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Qualitative Health Research SAGE

Immobility, Battles, and the Journey of Feeling Alive

Qualitative Health Research , Volume 22 (8): 10 – Aug 1, 2012

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References (52)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2012
ISSN
1049-7323
eISSN
1552-7557
DOI
10.1177/1049732312443738
pmid
22609634
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Australian mental health services have responded to the problem of depression by adopting an early intervention and recovery orientation. Using qualitative research conducted in Australia with 80 women aged 20 to 75 years, we examine how participants invoked particular metaphors to construct meaning about the gendered experience of depression and recovery. We argue that women’s stories of recovery provide a rich source of interpretive material to consider the everyday metaphors of recovery beyond clinical notions and linear models of personal change. We identified key metaphors women drew on to articulate the struggle of self-transformation through depression and recovery: the immobilizing effect of depression, recovery as a battle to control depression, and recovery as a journey of self-knowledge. Our findings might be useful for mental health professionals in a range of clinical contexts to reflect on the power of language for shaping how women interpret their experiences of recovery from depression.

Journal

Qualitative Health ResearchSAGE

Published: Aug 1, 2012

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