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Implicit Attitude Generalization From Black to Black–White Biracial Group Members

Implicit Attitude Generalization From Black to Black–White Biracial Group Members We investigated whether Black–White biracial individuals are perceived as Black in the domain of evaluation. Previous research has documented that White perceivers’ negative evaluation of one Black person leads to a negative implicit evaluation of another Black person belonging to the same minimal group. We built upon this out-group transfer effect by investigating whether perceivers also transferred negative implicit attitudes from one Black person to a novel Black–White biracial person. In three experiments, participants learned about a Black individual who performed undesirable behaviors and were then introduced to a new group member. White perceivers formed negative attitudes toward the original individual and transferred these attitudes to the new group member if she was Black or Biracial, but not if she was White (Experiment 1) or Asian (Experiment 2). Experiment 3 demonstrated that only White participants exhibited transfer to the new Black and Biracial group members; Black participants did not. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Psychological and Personality Science SAGE

Implicit Attitude Generalization From Black to Black–White Biracial Group Members

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References (32)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2015
ISSN
1948-5506
eISSN
1948-5514
DOI
10.1177/1948550614567686
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We investigated whether Black–White biracial individuals are perceived as Black in the domain of evaluation. Previous research has documented that White perceivers’ negative evaluation of one Black person leads to a negative implicit evaluation of another Black person belonging to the same minimal group. We built upon this out-group transfer effect by investigating whether perceivers also transferred negative implicit attitudes from one Black person to a novel Black–White biracial person. In three experiments, participants learned about a Black individual who performed undesirable behaviors and were then introduced to a new group member. White perceivers formed negative attitudes toward the original individual and transferred these attitudes to the new group member if she was Black or Biracial, but not if she was White (Experiment 1) or Asian (Experiment 2). Experiment 3 demonstrated that only White participants exhibited transfer to the new Black and Biracial group members; Black participants did not.

Journal

Social Psychological and Personality ScienceSAGE

Published: Jul 1, 2015

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