Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Inclusive versus exclusive: A cross-national comparison of the effects of subnational, national, and supranational identity

Inclusive versus exclusive: A cross-national comparison of the effects of subnational, national,... A superordinate identity reduces bias and facilitates intergroup cooperation. This suggests that getting European Union (EU) citizens to identify with Europe will decrease outgroup hostility. Is European identity thus a superordinate identity? Using Eurobarometer data, I determine which level of identification is the most inclusive for individuals' immigration attitudes. Those who feel European hold more favorable views toward immigrants—an effect that is amplified under conditions of cross-cutting cleavages and where country length of European Union membership is greatest. In contrast, strong national identity is associated with more negative immigration attitudes; regional identity has no effect. A subsequent test confirms that the benefits of identifying with Europe extend most strongly to immigrants of European Union origin, although positive effects are observed toward non-European Union migrants as well. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Union Politics SAGE

Inclusive versus exclusive: A cross-national comparison of the effects of subnational, national, and supranational identity

European Union Politics , Volume 15 (4): 26 – Dec 1, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/inclusive-versus-exclusive-a-cross-national-comparison-of-the-effects-SqwQljQ0av

References (94)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav
ISSN
1465-1165
eISSN
1741-2757
DOI
10.1177/1465116514528058
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A superordinate identity reduces bias and facilitates intergroup cooperation. This suggests that getting European Union (EU) citizens to identify with Europe will decrease outgroup hostility. Is European identity thus a superordinate identity? Using Eurobarometer data, I determine which level of identification is the most inclusive for individuals' immigration attitudes. Those who feel European hold more favorable views toward immigrants—an effect that is amplified under conditions of cross-cutting cleavages and where country length of European Union membership is greatest. In contrast, strong national identity is associated with more negative immigration attitudes; regional identity has no effect. A subsequent test confirms that the benefits of identifying with Europe extend most strongly to immigrants of European Union origin, although positive effects are observed toward non-European Union migrants as well.

Journal

European Union PoliticsSAGE

Published: Dec 1, 2014

There are no references for this article.