Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

International Migration and the Restructuring of Gender Asymmetries: Continuity and Change among Filipino Labor Migrants in Rome1

International Migration and the Restructuring of Gender Asymmetries: Continuity and Change among... This article examines the different factors which may explain gender-selectivity among Filipino labor migrants in Rome, where women are around 70 percent of this nationality group. Following the analysis of labor demand in the domestic service sector, it explores ‘supply’ aspects, ranging from economic conditions within the Philippine labor market to noneconomic constraints, such as ideologies and expectations of gender. The research findings show that migrant women's commitments and obligations toward their households in home areas are generally stronger than those of their male counterparts. However, spatial distance and increased financial independence may provide some women with the opportunity to pursue ‘self-interested’ goals while at the same time keeping within the ‘altruistic’ role dictated by normative gender roles. Important elements affecting women's increased autonomy are life course paths, households’ developmental cycle, class and migration form. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Migration Review SAGE

International Migration and the Restructuring of Gender Asymmetries: Continuity and Change among Filipino Labor Migrants in Rome1

International Migration Review , Volume 33 (3): 25 – Sep 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/international-migration-and-the-restructuring-of-gender-asymmetries-vG3SLmUcQ5

References (35)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1999 Center for Migration Studies
ISSN
0197-9183
eISSN
1747-7379
DOI
10.1177/019791839903300305
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article examines the different factors which may explain gender-selectivity among Filipino labor migrants in Rome, where women are around 70 percent of this nationality group. Following the analysis of labor demand in the domestic service sector, it explores ‘supply’ aspects, ranging from economic conditions within the Philippine labor market to noneconomic constraints, such as ideologies and expectations of gender. The research findings show that migrant women's commitments and obligations toward their households in home areas are generally stronger than those of their male counterparts. However, spatial distance and increased financial independence may provide some women with the opportunity to pursue ‘self-interested’ goals while at the same time keeping within the ‘altruistic’ role dictated by normative gender roles. Important elements affecting women's increased autonomy are life course paths, households’ developmental cycle, class and migration form.

Journal

International Migration ReviewSAGE

Published: Sep 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.