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Introduction: Impossibilities of Automobility

Introduction: Impossibilities of Automobility Part One Conceptualizing Automobility Introduction: Impossibilities of automobility Steffen Böhm, Campbell Jones, Chris Land and Mat Paterson From the automobile to automobility Automobiles, their production, consumption, meaning and consequences, have vexed and intrigued theorists, governments, businesses, unions, protesters and activists from their inception in the late nineteenth century to the present day. As a figure of the contemporary landscape, the automobile evokes the concerns and thematics of modernity, whether these are the rationalized, automated pro- duction line of Henry Ford or the seemingly insatiable appetite for speed and movement that is its counterpoint. Automobiles have thus become a topic about which there is great interest across the social sciences, as well as outside acade- mia. There is consequently a substantial volume of works on the automobile, with varying focuses on history (for example McShane, 1994; O’Connell, 1998; Scharff, 1991), urban development (Kunstler, 1994; Bottles, 1987), environmen- tal politics (Freund & Martin, 1993; Zielinski & Laird, 1996; Whitelegg, 1997; Seel, Paterson & Doherty, 2000), political economy and industrial relations (Luger, 2000; Deyo, 1996; Rupert, 1995), cultural studies (Wernick, 1991; Miller, 2001; Gartman, 1994; Sachs, 1992), or public policy (Dunn, 1998) – these are just a small selection of the existing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Sociological Review SAGE

Introduction: Impossibilities of Automobility

The Sociological Review , Volume 54 (1_suppl): 14 – Oct 1, 2006

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References (42)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2006 The Editorial Board of the Sociological Review
ISSN
0038-0261
eISSN
1467-954X
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-954X.2006.00634.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Part One Conceptualizing Automobility Introduction: Impossibilities of automobility Steffen Böhm, Campbell Jones, Chris Land and Mat Paterson From the automobile to automobility Automobiles, their production, consumption, meaning and consequences, have vexed and intrigued theorists, governments, businesses, unions, protesters and activists from their inception in the late nineteenth century to the present day. As a figure of the contemporary landscape, the automobile evokes the concerns and thematics of modernity, whether these are the rationalized, automated pro- duction line of Henry Ford or the seemingly insatiable appetite for speed and movement that is its counterpoint. Automobiles have thus become a topic about which there is great interest across the social sciences, as well as outside acade- mia. There is consequently a substantial volume of works on the automobile, with varying focuses on history (for example McShane, 1994; O’Connell, 1998; Scharff, 1991), urban development (Kunstler, 1994; Bottles, 1987), environmen- tal politics (Freund & Martin, 1993; Zielinski & Laird, 1996; Whitelegg, 1997; Seel, Paterson & Doherty, 2000), political economy and industrial relations (Luger, 2000; Deyo, 1996; Rupert, 1995), cultural studies (Wernick, 1991; Miller, 2001; Gartman, 1994; Sachs, 1992), or public policy (Dunn, 1998) – these are just a small selection of the existing

Journal

The Sociological ReviewSAGE

Published: Oct 1, 2006

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