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Irrigation Works in the Hawaiian Islands

Irrigation Works in the Hawaiian Islands M. M. O’SHAUGHNESSY Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers The development of irrigation projects in the Hawaiian Islands has been pros- ecuted with the greatest vigor by private corporations owning sugar estates dur- ing the last ten years. No aid for this work has been received from either the local Territorial Government of Hawaii or the National Government at Washington. What was formerly arid and unproductive soil, covered by wild brush and pas- turing a few cattle, has been converted into productive sugar-cane land, by the application of water at a heavy expenditure of money and enterprise. RAINFALL.—The rainfall of the Hawaiian Islands is very local and peculiar in its distribution. The trade-winds blow off the ocean from the northeast, and on this slope a rainfall of from 60 to 200 ins. Per annum is quite common, the intensity varying with the altitude and local configurations, while on the lee sides the rain is often as light as from 5 to 15 ins. The Islands, as rule, are quite rugged, varying in altitude at their central highest points from 3,000 to 10,000 ft. The windward sides are covered with a dense brush, which remains green throughout the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Organization & Environment SAGE

Irrigation Works in the Hawaiian Islands

Organization & Environment , Volume 20 (4): 6 – Dec 1, 2007

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1086-0266
eISSN
1552-7417
DOI
10.1177/1086026607309682
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

M. M. O’SHAUGHNESSY Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers The development of irrigation projects in the Hawaiian Islands has been pros- ecuted with the greatest vigor by private corporations owning sugar estates dur- ing the last ten years. No aid for this work has been received from either the local Territorial Government of Hawaii or the National Government at Washington. What was formerly arid and unproductive soil, covered by wild brush and pas- turing a few cattle, has been converted into productive sugar-cane land, by the application of water at a heavy expenditure of money and enterprise. RAINFALL.—The rainfall of the Hawaiian Islands is very local and peculiar in its distribution. The trade-winds blow off the ocean from the northeast, and on this slope a rainfall of from 60 to 200 ins. Per annum is quite common, the intensity varying with the altitude and local configurations, while on the lee sides the rain is often as light as from 5 to 15 ins. The Islands, as rule, are quite rugged, varying in altitude at their central highest points from 3,000 to 10,000 ft. The windward sides are covered with a dense brush, which remains green throughout the

Journal

Organization & EnvironmentSAGE

Published: Dec 1, 2007

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