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Learning by Teaching/Addressing a Need: Peer Tutoring in Your Orchestra Program

Learning by Teaching/Addressing a Need: Peer Tutoring in Your Orchestra Program Learning by Teaching/Addressing a Need: Peer Tutoring in Your Orchestra Program He who teaches others, teaches himself. (Johann Amos Comenius, 1592-1670) by Richard Webb “Providing individual attention to the string student through private lessons is important and accepted by both tradition and current practice.” The student, school orchestra director and private instructor form a teaching and learning triangle with both teachers offering a different insight and expertise that fosters the growth of the young musician. Unfortunately, the opportunity to study privately with a professional string teacher may not be feasible and the orchestra teacher, whose time is already spread thin, may not be able to offer consistent after-school private lessons. To address this need for private instructors, high school musicians often are offered the opportunity to teach their younger peers and earn money for it. This gives some young string players private instruction that they probably would not have received. Addition- ally, the tutors receive cognitive and affective advantages from the act of teaching. The purpose of this article is to discuss the benefits of peer tutoring in a private lesson setting and to offer suggestions to the orchestra teacher for providing support and guidance to high- school students http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American String Teacher SAGE

Learning by Teaching/Addressing a Need: Peer Tutoring in Your Orchestra Program

American String Teacher , Volume 62 (3): 6 – Aug 1, 2012

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References (11)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2012 American String Teachers Association
ISSN
0003-1313
eISSN
2515-4842
DOI
10.1177/000313131206200307
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Learning by Teaching/Addressing a Need: Peer Tutoring in Your Orchestra Program He who teaches others, teaches himself. (Johann Amos Comenius, 1592-1670) by Richard Webb “Providing individual attention to the string student through private lessons is important and accepted by both tradition and current practice.” The student, school orchestra director and private instructor form a teaching and learning triangle with both teachers offering a different insight and expertise that fosters the growth of the young musician. Unfortunately, the opportunity to study privately with a professional string teacher may not be feasible and the orchestra teacher, whose time is already spread thin, may not be able to offer consistent after-school private lessons. To address this need for private instructors, high school musicians often are offered the opportunity to teach their younger peers and earn money for it. This gives some young string players private instruction that they probably would not have received. Addition- ally, the tutors receive cognitive and affective advantages from the act of teaching. The purpose of this article is to discuss the benefits of peer tutoring in a private lesson setting and to offer suggestions to the orchestra teacher for providing support and guidance to high- school students

Journal

American String TeacherSAGE

Published: Aug 1, 2012

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