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Living Room: Rematerialising Home

Living Room: Rematerialising Home Environment and Planning A 2008, volume 40, pages 515 ^ 519 doi:10.1068/a40357 Guest editorial In recent years there has been an explosion of scholarship around the concept of home. Extending well beyond traditional social and cultural geographical concerns with the public ^ private divide, this recent wave of home studies has teased out the complex meanings of home and its relationship to identity and subject formation. Notable here is the trend set by the journal Home Cultures; exemplary in this vein is the recent book Home (2006) by Alison Blunt and Robyn Dowling, who also contribute to the themed essays that follow in this issue. Among other things, scholarship such as this shows how home is a complex field of feelings and subjectivity: an anchor for senses of belonging, a mechanism for living with, and in, the experience of transnationalism, and a site for constituting and performing selfhood. Like other social and cultural geographies, this interest with the meaning of home is not untouched by a material turn. There has been, for example, a new appreciation of the coconstitutive relationship between the formal features of actual dwellings and the social life that inhabits them. In good part inaugurating such http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environment and Planning A SAGE

Living Room: Rematerialising Home

Environment and Planning A , Volume 40 (3): 5 – Mar 1, 2008

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References (23)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2008 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0308-518X
eISSN
1472-3409
DOI
10.1068/a40357
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Environment and Planning A 2008, volume 40, pages 515 ^ 519 doi:10.1068/a40357 Guest editorial In recent years there has been an explosion of scholarship around the concept of home. Extending well beyond traditional social and cultural geographical concerns with the public ^ private divide, this recent wave of home studies has teased out the complex meanings of home and its relationship to identity and subject formation. Notable here is the trend set by the journal Home Cultures; exemplary in this vein is the recent book Home (2006) by Alison Blunt and Robyn Dowling, who also contribute to the themed essays that follow in this issue. Among other things, scholarship such as this shows how home is a complex field of feelings and subjectivity: an anchor for senses of belonging, a mechanism for living with, and in, the experience of transnationalism, and a site for constituting and performing selfhood. Like other social and cultural geographies, this interest with the meaning of home is not untouched by a material turn. There has been, for example, a new appreciation of the coconstitutive relationship between the formal features of actual dwellings and the social life that inhabits them. In good part inaugurating such

Journal

Environment and Planning ASAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2008

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