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Mapping Posthumanism: An Exchange

Mapping Posthumanism: An Exchange Environment and Planning A 2004, volume 36, pages 1341 ^ 1363 DOI:10.1068/a37127 Organisers Noel Castree, Catherine Nash Noel Castree, Catherine Nash 1341 Neil Badmington 1344 Bruce Braun 1352 Jonathan Murdoch 1356 Sarah Whatmore 1360 Introduction: posthumanism in question Noel Castree School of Geography, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, England; e-mail: noel.castree@man.ac.uk Catherine Nash Department of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, England; e-mail: c.nash@qmul.ac.uk Received 20 May 2004 The serried ranks of post-prefixed isms marched their way through human geography during the 1990s. To open the door to yet another may seem the habitual act of a hopelessly trendy discipline, one derivatively preoccupied with what's de rigeur in the social sciences and humanities. Yet there might be something both apposite and productive about staging a confrontation between a subject whose very title announces its determined commitment to ontological purity and a discourse that questions this kind of delusive hygiene. In one sense, of course, that confrontation has been ongoing for several years now. Since the early 1990s many `human geographers' have steadfastly questioned the adequacy of the appellation used to describe themselves, their research, and their discipline. Drawing upon the thinking of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environment and Planning A SAGE

Mapping Posthumanism: An Exchange

Environment and Planning A , Volume 36 (8): 23 – Aug 1, 2004

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References (22)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2004 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0308-518X
eISSN
1472-3409
DOI
10.1068/a37127
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Environment and Planning A 2004, volume 36, pages 1341 ^ 1363 DOI:10.1068/a37127 Organisers Noel Castree, Catherine Nash Noel Castree, Catherine Nash 1341 Neil Badmington 1344 Bruce Braun 1352 Jonathan Murdoch 1356 Sarah Whatmore 1360 Introduction: posthumanism in question Noel Castree School of Geography, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, England; e-mail: noel.castree@man.ac.uk Catherine Nash Department of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, England; e-mail: c.nash@qmul.ac.uk Received 20 May 2004 The serried ranks of post-prefixed isms marched their way through human geography during the 1990s. To open the door to yet another may seem the habitual act of a hopelessly trendy discipline, one derivatively preoccupied with what's de rigeur in the social sciences and humanities. Yet there might be something both apposite and productive about staging a confrontation between a subject whose very title announces its determined commitment to ontological purity and a discourse that questions this kind of delusive hygiene. In one sense, of course, that confrontation has been ongoing for several years now. Since the early 1990s many `human geographers' have steadfastly questioned the adequacy of the appellation used to describe themselves, their research, and their discipline. Drawing upon the thinking of

Journal

Environment and Planning ASAGE

Published: Aug 1, 2004

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