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Mentoring Relationship Quality Profiles and Their Association With Urban, Low-Income Youth’s Academic Outcomes

Mentoring Relationship Quality Profiles and Their Association With Urban, Low-Income Youth’s... This study aimed to (a) identify mentoring quality profiles based on characteristics of informal mentoring relationships, (b) examine how mentor and youth demographic characteristics were related to the profiles, and (c) investigate whether the profiles were related to youth’s academic outcomes. Participants were 411 ninth-grade urban, low-income students. Mentors were comprised of older siblings, extended family members, and non-familial adults. Using cluster analysis, we identified two mentoring quality relationship profiles: (a) less close and growth oriented and (b) closer and more growth oriented. Boys were more likely to have less close and growth-oriented relationship profiles or to be in the non-mentored group compared with girls. Univariate tests showed differences among relationship profile groups and non-mentored groups on intrinsic motivation, educational aspirations and expectations, perceived economic benefits, and limitations of education and grade point average (GPA). The study reveals the importance of taking a within-group, person-centered approach when examining mentoring relationships. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Youth & Society SAGE

Mentoring Relationship Quality Profiles and Their Association With Urban, Low-Income Youth’s Academic Outcomes

Youth & Society , Volume 51 (4): 20 – May 1, 2019

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References (27)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2016
ISSN
0044-118X
eISSN
1552-8499
DOI
10.1177/0044118X16668058
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study aimed to (a) identify mentoring quality profiles based on characteristics of informal mentoring relationships, (b) examine how mentor and youth demographic characteristics were related to the profiles, and (c) investigate whether the profiles were related to youth’s academic outcomes. Participants were 411 ninth-grade urban, low-income students. Mentors were comprised of older siblings, extended family members, and non-familial adults. Using cluster analysis, we identified two mentoring quality relationship profiles: (a) less close and growth oriented and (b) closer and more growth oriented. Boys were more likely to have less close and growth-oriented relationship profiles or to be in the non-mentored group compared with girls. Univariate tests showed differences among relationship profile groups and non-mentored groups on intrinsic motivation, educational aspirations and expectations, perceived economic benefits, and limitations of education and grade point average (GPA). The study reveals the importance of taking a within-group, person-centered approach when examining mentoring relationships.

Journal

Youth & SocietySAGE

Published: May 1, 2019

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