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Metaphors as Tools in Clinical Sociology: Bereavement Education and Counseling

Metaphors as Tools in Clinical Sociology: Bereavement Education and Counseling Although the metaphor has long been used as an educational tool in sociology, its use in sociological practice has been limited. However, the affinity between the metaphor and the sociological perspective affords the sociological practitioner a unique opportunity to meet a client in a created space of shared meaning. This is useful when the client's situation is too painful to share his or her thoughts and feelings with an outsider, or when the clinician and client come from very different backgrounds. Metaphors may be voluntarily presented by the client, elicited from the client, or designed by the clinician. Techniques to enhance efficacy and ethical considerations are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Sociology SAGE

Metaphors as Tools in Clinical Sociology: Bereavement Education and Counseling

Journal of Applied Sociology , Volume os-23 (2): 14 – Sep 1, 2006

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2006 Association for Applied Social Science
ISSN
0749-0232
eISSN
1937-0245
DOI
10.1177/19367244062300205
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although the metaphor has long been used as an educational tool in sociology, its use in sociological practice has been limited. However, the affinity between the metaphor and the sociological perspective affords the sociological practitioner a unique opportunity to meet a client in a created space of shared meaning. This is useful when the client's situation is too painful to share his or her thoughts and feelings with an outsider, or when the clinician and client come from very different backgrounds. Metaphors may be voluntarily presented by the client, elicited from the client, or designed by the clinician. Techniques to enhance efficacy and ethical considerations are discussed.

Journal

Journal of Applied SociologySAGE

Published: Sep 1, 2006

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