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My Home: text, space and performance

My Home: text, space and performance cultural geographies 2007 14: 309–318 cultural geographies in practice My Home: text, space and performance Alison Blunt, Jayani Bonnerjee, Caron Lipman, Joanna Long and Felicity Paynter Department of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London We were sitting in the living room, warming up and drying out with some hot tea, when suddenly a hatch opened and a Somali man popped his head out. He beckoned us onto the balcony and, gesturing towards the council estate around us, described his beautiful garden in Somalia and all the things that grew there. He was the first of five characters we would meet over the next hour as we explored three empty flats in Shelmerdine Close, Bow, that had been transformed into the homes of Polish, Kurdish, Somali and Vietnamese migrants to London, in London Bubble’s performances of ‘My Home’. Through these spaces and the verbatim re-telling of stories gathered in interviews, we learned what home meant to different people. From his leather armchair in a richly red room, a Polish man and two friends talked about home as invoking a feeling of comfort. Over tea and biscuits, and amidst piles of boxes, a Polish woman shared memories of the orange carpet http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cultural Geographies SAGE

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1474-4740
eISSN
1477-0881
DOI
10.1177/1474474007075375
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

cultural geographies 2007 14: 309–318 cultural geographies in practice My Home: text, space and performance Alison Blunt, Jayani Bonnerjee, Caron Lipman, Joanna Long and Felicity Paynter Department of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London We were sitting in the living room, warming up and drying out with some hot tea, when suddenly a hatch opened and a Somali man popped his head out. He beckoned us onto the balcony and, gesturing towards the council estate around us, described his beautiful garden in Somalia and all the things that grew there. He was the first of five characters we would meet over the next hour as we explored three empty flats in Shelmerdine Close, Bow, that had been transformed into the homes of Polish, Kurdish, Somali and Vietnamese migrants to London, in London Bubble’s performances of ‘My Home’. Through these spaces and the verbatim re-telling of stories gathered in interviews, we learned what home meant to different people. From his leather armchair in a richly red room, a Polish man and two friends talked about home as invoking a feeling of comfort. Over tea and biscuits, and amidst piles of boxes, a Polish woman shared memories of the orange carpet

Journal

Cultural GeographiesSAGE

Published: Apr 1, 2007

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