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Nature is Dead! Long Live Nature

Nature is Dead! Long Live Nature Environment and Planning A 2004, volume 36, pages 191 ^ 194 DOI:10.1068/a36209 Commentary Nature, it seems, no longer stirs the research passions of those on the Left of human geography. For a decade it was very much `on the agenda': in both a biophysical and a discursive sense Left-leaning geographers spent a good deal of the 1990s preoccupied with `the matter of nature' (Fitzsimmons, 1989). But today that earlier enthusiasm seems to have morphed into a fascination for the `postnatural': metaphorically speaking, hybrids, chimeras, rhizomes, and actor-networks are now all the rage. This new concern has fundamentally altered explanatory and normative vocabularies. It is rapidly leading those on the geographical Left away from a dualistic imaginaryöone that approached nature using notions like `interaction', `dialectic', and `construction'ötowards a relational worldview wherein the nature ^ society dichotomy is redundant. This is all to the good. But it would be wrong to think that nature no longer matters. The baroque jargon of academia may confidently declare that there never was a Maginot line dividing natural things from social things. But in several walks of life people continue to speak and act as though such a divide were self-evident. Let me offer an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environment and Planning A SAGE

Nature is Dead! Long Live Nature

Environment and Planning A , Volume 36 (2): 4 – Feb 1, 2004

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References (9)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2004 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0308-518X
eISSN
1472-3409
DOI
10.1068/a36209
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Environment and Planning A 2004, volume 36, pages 191 ^ 194 DOI:10.1068/a36209 Commentary Nature, it seems, no longer stirs the research passions of those on the Left of human geography. For a decade it was very much `on the agenda': in both a biophysical and a discursive sense Left-leaning geographers spent a good deal of the 1990s preoccupied with `the matter of nature' (Fitzsimmons, 1989). But today that earlier enthusiasm seems to have morphed into a fascination for the `postnatural': metaphorically speaking, hybrids, chimeras, rhizomes, and actor-networks are now all the rage. This new concern has fundamentally altered explanatory and normative vocabularies. It is rapidly leading those on the geographical Left away from a dualistic imaginaryöone that approached nature using notions like `interaction', `dialectic', and `construction'ötowards a relational worldview wherein the nature ^ society dichotomy is redundant. This is all to the good. But it would be wrong to think that nature no longer matters. The baroque jargon of academia may confidently declare that there never was a Maginot line dividing natural things from social things. But in several walks of life people continue to speak and act as though such a divide were self-evident. Let me offer an

Journal

Environment and Planning ASAGE

Published: Feb 1, 2004

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