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Nature, technology and the modern city: an introduction

Nature, technology and the modern city: an introduction cultural geographies 2006 13: 491 496 introduction Nature, technology and the modern city: an introduction Simon Gunn and Alastair Owens Centre for Urban History, University of Leicester Department of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London ne of modernity’s most persistent examples of binary thinking has been its separation of ‘the natural’ from ‘the social’. As Maria Kaika has noted, this ontological division has found a more precise spatial articulation in the nature/city dualism. As nature’s ‘other’, the modern city stands in stark opposition to the natural world, representing the triumph of human technology and reason over non-human environmental forces. Yet this insistence on the separation of nature from the modern city obscures the ongoing historical geographical processes of transformation which radically rework nature in the service of the city. In response, this issue of cultural geographies presents four articles that provide historical insights into the paradoxical relationship between nature and the modern city, revealing on the one hand how nature came to be discursively separated from (urban) culture and how, on the other, the production of modern city spaces was predicated on the coming together of human and non-human resources, leading to a fundamental remaking of what Erik Swyngedouw http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cultural Geographies SAGE

Nature, technology and the modern city: an introduction

Cultural Geographies , Volume 13 (4): 6 – Oct 1, 2006

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References (27)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1474-4740
eISSN
1477-0881
DOI
10.1191/1474474006cgj371ed
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

cultural geographies 2006 13: 491 496 introduction Nature, technology and the modern city: an introduction Simon Gunn and Alastair Owens Centre for Urban History, University of Leicester Department of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London ne of modernity’s most persistent examples of binary thinking has been its separation of ‘the natural’ from ‘the social’. As Maria Kaika has noted, this ontological division has found a more precise spatial articulation in the nature/city dualism. As nature’s ‘other’, the modern city stands in stark opposition to the natural world, representing the triumph of human technology and reason over non-human environmental forces. Yet this insistence on the separation of nature from the modern city obscures the ongoing historical geographical processes of transformation which radically rework nature in the service of the city. In response, this issue of cultural geographies presents four articles that provide historical insights into the paradoxical relationship between nature and the modern city, revealing on the one hand how nature came to be discursively separated from (urban) culture and how, on the other, the production of modern city spaces was predicated on the coming together of human and non-human resources, leading to a fundamental remaking of what Erik Swyngedouw

Journal

Cultural GeographiesSAGE

Published: Oct 1, 2006

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