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Neither Conflict Nor Labeling Nor Paternalism Will Suffice: Intersections of Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Family in Criminal Court Decisions

Neither Conflict Nor Labeling Nor Paternalism Will Suffice: Intersections of Race, Ethnicity,... This statistical study examines sentencing and pretrial release decisions for black, white, and Hispanic men and women, using data from New York City and Seattle criminal courts. Hypotheses are tested on the interactive influences of gender and family, and the mitigating effects of family for men and women of different race and ethnic groups. The results show that gender differences in court outcomes can be explained by defendants' familial circumstances, and that such differences are greatest for black defendants. Arguing that neither the male-centered conflict or labeling perspectives, nor the paternalism thesis capture the logic of court decision making, I call for more research on how familial-based justice practices are classed, raced, and gendered. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Crime & Delinquency SAGE

Neither Conflict Nor Labeling Nor Paternalism Will Suffice: Intersections of Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Family in Criminal Court Decisions

Crime & Delinquency , Volume 35 (1): 33 – Jan 1, 1989

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References (37)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0011-1287
eISSN
1552-387X
DOI
10.1177/0011128789035001007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This statistical study examines sentencing and pretrial release decisions for black, white, and Hispanic men and women, using data from New York City and Seattle criminal courts. Hypotheses are tested on the interactive influences of gender and family, and the mitigating effects of family for men and women of different race and ethnic groups. The results show that gender differences in court outcomes can be explained by defendants' familial circumstances, and that such differences are greatest for black defendants. Arguing that neither the male-centered conflict or labeling perspectives, nor the paternalism thesis capture the logic of court decision making, I call for more research on how familial-based justice practices are classed, raced, and gendered.

Journal

Crime & DelinquencySAGE

Published: Jan 1, 1989

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