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Nonmedical Prescription Drug Use Among Adolescents

Nonmedical Prescription Drug Use Among Adolescents There has been a tremendous increase in the prevalence of nonmedical prescription drug use among adolescents in recent years. Research now indicates that the prevalence of nonmedical prescription drug use is greater than the prevalence of other illicit drug use, excluding marijuana. Despite these recent trends, there is a dearth of research in the social sciences on this issue. Furthermore, existing research on this topic is largely atheoretical. Using the 2005 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, a nationally representative survey of persons age 12 and older, the current study examines the impact of social bonds to family and school on nonmedical prescription drug use among adolescents. The findings provide support for social control theory. Adolescents with strong bonds to family and school are less likely to report nonmedical prescription drug use. Important implications and future research needs are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Youth & Society SAGE

Nonmedical Prescription Drug Use Among Adolescents

Youth & Society , Volume 40 (3): 17 – Mar 1, 2009

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References (85)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0044-118X
eISSN
1552-8499
DOI
10.1177/0044118X08316345
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There has been a tremendous increase in the prevalence of nonmedical prescription drug use among adolescents in recent years. Research now indicates that the prevalence of nonmedical prescription drug use is greater than the prevalence of other illicit drug use, excluding marijuana. Despite these recent trends, there is a dearth of research in the social sciences on this issue. Furthermore, existing research on this topic is largely atheoretical. Using the 2005 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, a nationally representative survey of persons age 12 and older, the current study examines the impact of social bonds to family and school on nonmedical prescription drug use among adolescents. The findings provide support for social control theory. Adolescents with strong bonds to family and school are less likely to report nonmedical prescription drug use. Important implications and future research needs are discussed.

Journal

Youth & SocietySAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2009

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