Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Partnership in U.K. Biobank: A Third Way for Genomic Property?

Partnership in U.K. Biobank: A Third Way for Genomic Property? <jats:p>Although scientific and commercial excitement about genomic biobanks has subsided since the biotech bust in 2000, they continue to fascinate life scientists, bioethicists, and politicians alike. Indeed, these assemblages of personal health information, human DNA, and heterogeneous capital have become and remain important events in the ethics and politics of the life sciences. For starters, they continue to reveal and produce the central scientific, technological, and economic paradigms so ascendant in biology today: genome, infotech, and market. Biobanks also illustrate what might be called the new distributive politics of biomedical research. Within those politics, the commodification of persons – or at the very least, of their informational representations – has challenged the ontological, ethical, and political underpinnings of the social contract between researchers and their human research subjects. In brief, biobanks are unsettling relations between genes, tissue, medical records, and persons (both individual and collective). But it is also clear that these relations are increasingly being restructured by new rights of control, access, exclusion, and use known as “property,” both material and intellectual.</jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Law Medicine & Ethics SAGE

Partnership in U.K. Biobank: A Third Way for Genomic Property?

The Journal of Law Medicine & Ethics , Volume 35 (3): 17 – Aug 1, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/partnership-in-u-k-biobank-a-third-way-for-genomic-property-hWFL000WH3

References (67)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2007 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics
ISSN
1073-1105
eISSN
1748-720X
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-720X.2007.00166.x
pmid
17714253
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p>Although scientific and commercial excitement about genomic biobanks has subsided since the biotech bust in 2000, they continue to fascinate life scientists, bioethicists, and politicians alike. Indeed, these assemblages of personal health information, human DNA, and heterogeneous capital have become and remain important events in the ethics and politics of the life sciences. For starters, they continue to reveal and produce the central scientific, technological, and economic paradigms so ascendant in biology today: genome, infotech, and market. Biobanks also illustrate what might be called the new distributive politics of biomedical research. Within those politics, the commodification of persons – or at the very least, of their informational representations – has challenged the ontological, ethical, and political underpinnings of the social contract between researchers and their human research subjects. In brief, biobanks are unsettling relations between genes, tissue, medical records, and persons (both individual and collective). But it is also clear that these relations are increasingly being restructured by new rights of control, access, exclusion, and use known as “property,” both material and intellectual.</jats:p>

Journal

The Journal of Law Medicine & EthicsSAGE

Published: Aug 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.