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Prejudice in Politics: Group Position, Public Opinion, and the Wisconsin Treaty Rights Dispute

Prejudice in Politics: Group Position, Public Opinion, and the Wisconsin Treaty Rights Dispute 132–Inequalities of how economic and cultural capital is trans- fruitfully to Indian-white relations. Drawing mitted from one generation to another. The most directly on the work of Herbert Blumer, mechanisms of this wealth attainment model the authors employ a “group position” mod- el that incorporates conceptions of individ- are remarkably similar to those of the income ual-level prejudice without ignoring the col- attainment model. Family size, education, lective nature of racial politics. In this view, and even religion all have an impact on the dominant group members see subordinate accumulation of wealth. However, Keister is group members as inferior and intrinsically quick to note that much of the “wealth mo- different, and develop “a sense of proprietary bility” in America is attributable to the fact claim over certain rights, statuses, and re- that some individuals choose to become en- sources” (p. 32). When the dominant group trepreneurs. Although not all entrepreneurs feels that a subordinate group is threatening become wealthy, the most successful are able these proprietary claims, racial prejudice and to amass considerable wealth. Some of the conflict are likely to ensue. most interesting analyses in the book employ To explore the treaty rights issue, Bobo data from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Sociology: A Journal of Reviews SAGE

Prejudice in Politics: Group Position, Public Opinion, and the Wisconsin Treaty Rights Dispute

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2007 American Sociological Association
ISSN
0094-3061
eISSN
1939-8638
DOI
10.1177/009430610703600208
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

132–Inequalities of how economic and cultural capital is trans- fruitfully to Indian-white relations. Drawing mitted from one generation to another. The most directly on the work of Herbert Blumer, mechanisms of this wealth attainment model the authors employ a “group position” mod- el that incorporates conceptions of individ- are remarkably similar to those of the income ual-level prejudice without ignoring the col- attainment model. Family size, education, lective nature of racial politics. In this view, and even religion all have an impact on the dominant group members see subordinate accumulation of wealth. However, Keister is group members as inferior and intrinsically quick to note that much of the “wealth mo- different, and develop “a sense of proprietary bility” in America is attributable to the fact claim over certain rights, statuses, and re- that some individuals choose to become en- sources” (p. 32). When the dominant group trepreneurs. Although not all entrepreneurs feels that a subordinate group is threatening become wealthy, the most successful are able these proprietary claims, racial prejudice and to amass considerable wealth. Some of the conflict are likely to ensue. most interesting analyses in the book employ To explore the treaty rights issue, Bobo data from

Journal

Contemporary Sociology: A Journal of ReviewsSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.