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Questioning the Assumptions of Youth Violence Prevention Programs: The Role of Reflexive Evaluation in Program Development

Questioning the Assumptions of Youth Violence Prevention Programs: The Role of Reflexive... Several violence prevention projects are described and critiqued. One particular pilot program conducted with 20 Hispanic youth is reviewed. Evaluation of this after-school program emphasizing violence prevention, vocational training, and peer education revealed that students acquired job readiness skills and self-confidence in making presentations before groups. However, the value of violence prevention training was minimal. We introduce the role of reflexive evaluation to question the underlying assumptions of intervention programs. Specific assumptions of this and of previous programs are identified and critically assessed to foster a dialogue that will modify present practices and generate new ideas for future intervention programs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Sociology SAGE

Questioning the Assumptions of Youth Violence Prevention Programs: The Role of Reflexive Evaluation in Program Development

Journal of Applied Sociology , Volume os-20 (1): 27 – Mar 1, 2003

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2003 Association for Applied Social Science
ISSN
0749-0232
eISSN
1937-0245
DOI
10.1177/19367244032000102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Several violence prevention projects are described and critiqued. One particular pilot program conducted with 20 Hispanic youth is reviewed. Evaluation of this after-school program emphasizing violence prevention, vocational training, and peer education revealed that students acquired job readiness skills and self-confidence in making presentations before groups. However, the value of violence prevention training was minimal. We introduce the role of reflexive evaluation to question the underlying assumptions of intervention programs. Specific assumptions of this and of previous programs are identified and critically assessed to foster a dialogue that will modify present practices and generate new ideas for future intervention programs.

Journal

Journal of Applied SociologySAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2003

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