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Reducing Vehicle Collisions With the Central American Tapir in Central Belize District, Belize:

Reducing Vehicle Collisions With the Central American Tapir in Central Belize District, Belize: The Central American tapir Tapirus bairdii is the national animal of Belize. Accidents from vehicle collisions pose a new threat to the species. A total of 14 tapir deaths were recorded from June 2008 through December 2012 in Central Belize District. Two areas were identified as hot spots for tapir-vehicle collisions (TVCs), and spot-speed surveys revealed speeding to be common in that area. More than 47% of the vehicles were traveling above the prescribed speed limit, and another 28% were driving at speeds of 100 kph or faster. In an effort to reduce speed and the risk of TVCs, we deployed two sets of reflective wildlife crossing signs over a 6-km stretch of road. This was followed by an awareness campaign alerting drivers of tapirs’ presence in the area. We saw a significant reduction in speed immediately after the installation of the warning signs, and no TVCs were recorded for the next 10 months. Consequently, camera-trapping and track surveys were undertaken to confirm the species continued presence in the immediate area. Over the next 2 years, only two collisions were recorded along the same stretch of road. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tropical Conservation Science SAGE

Reducing Vehicle Collisions With the Central American Tapir in Central Belize District, Belize:

Reducing Vehicle Collisions With the Central American Tapir in Central Belize District, Belize:

Tropical Conservation Science , Volume 11: 1 – Jul 23, 2018

Abstract

The Central American tapir Tapirus bairdii is the national animal of Belize. Accidents from vehicle collisions pose a new threat to the species. A total of 14 tapir deaths were recorded from June 2008 through December 2012 in Central Belize District. Two areas were identified as hot spots for tapir-vehicle collisions (TVCs), and spot-speed surveys revealed speeding to be common in that area. More than 47% of the vehicles were traveling above the prescribed speed limit, and another 28% were driving at speeds of 100 kph or faster. In an effort to reduce speed and the risk of TVCs, we deployed two sets of reflective wildlife crossing signs over a 6-km stretch of road. This was followed by an awareness campaign alerting drivers of tapirs’ presence in the area. We saw a significant reduction in speed immediately after the installation of the warning signs, and no TVCs were recorded for the next 10 months. Consequently, camera-trapping and track surveys were undertaken to confirm the species continued presence in the immediate area. Over the next 2 years, only two collisions were recorded along the same stretch of road.

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References (30)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 by SAGE Publications Inc, unless otherwise noted. Manuscript content on this site is licensed under Creative Commons Licenses.
ISSN
1940-0829
eISSN
1940-0829
DOI
10.1177/1940082918789827
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Central American tapir Tapirus bairdii is the national animal of Belize. Accidents from vehicle collisions pose a new threat to the species. A total of 14 tapir deaths were recorded from June 2008 through December 2012 in Central Belize District. Two areas were identified as hot spots for tapir-vehicle collisions (TVCs), and spot-speed surveys revealed speeding to be common in that area. More than 47% of the vehicles were traveling above the prescribed speed limit, and another 28% were driving at speeds of 100 kph or faster. In an effort to reduce speed and the risk of TVCs, we deployed two sets of reflective wildlife crossing signs over a 6-km stretch of road. This was followed by an awareness campaign alerting drivers of tapirs’ presence in the area. We saw a significant reduction in speed immediately after the installation of the warning signs, and no TVCs were recorded for the next 10 months. Consequently, camera-trapping and track surveys were undertaken to confirm the species continued presence in the immediate area. Over the next 2 years, only two collisions were recorded along the same stretch of road.

Journal

Tropical Conservation ScienceSAGE

Published: Jul 23, 2018

Keywords: Central American tapir; camera trapping; endangered species; road ecology; Tapirus bairdii; wildlife-vehicle collision

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