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Regions in revolt

Regions in revolt Progress in Human Geography 25,1 (2001) pp. 103–110 John Agnew Department of Geography, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1524, USA I Introduction Along with a renewed interest in the philosophy of place and region and the return of a political economy focused on regions as the settings for economic development, addressed in two previous reports (Agnew, 1999; 2000a), a major thrust in recent geo- graphical studies has involved examining the political uses to which regions are increasingly put by political movements and parties. Although many autonomist and secessionist political movements are based in specific regions within existing states, it is their putative ethnic rather than regional (or other) attributes that garner attention from most of those who study them. Ethnicity, defined in religious and/or linguistic terms, allied to collective identity as a distinctive population, is seen as the most important cause of demands for increased political autonomy or ‘home rule’. Increasingly, in fact, all types of rebellion and political fragmentation, from the Hutu genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda in 1994 through the tribal break-up of Somalia in the early 1990s to the flowering of anti-state movements in Europe and throughout the former USSR, are swept into the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Progress in Human Geography SAGE

Regions in revolt

Progress in Human Geography , Volume 25 (1): 8 – Mar 1, 2001

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References (59)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0309-1325
eISSN
1477-0288
DOI
10.1191/030913201673210318
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Progress in Human Geography 25,1 (2001) pp. 103–110 John Agnew Department of Geography, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1524, USA I Introduction Along with a renewed interest in the philosophy of place and region and the return of a political economy focused on regions as the settings for economic development, addressed in two previous reports (Agnew, 1999; 2000a), a major thrust in recent geo- graphical studies has involved examining the political uses to which regions are increasingly put by political movements and parties. Although many autonomist and secessionist political movements are based in specific regions within existing states, it is their putative ethnic rather than regional (or other) attributes that garner attention from most of those who study them. Ethnicity, defined in religious and/or linguistic terms, allied to collective identity as a distinctive population, is seen as the most important cause of demands for increased political autonomy or ‘home rule’. Increasingly, in fact, all types of rebellion and political fragmentation, from the Hutu genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda in 1994 through the tribal break-up of Somalia in the early 1990s to the flowering of anti-state movements in Europe and throughout the former USSR, are swept into the

Journal

Progress in Human GeographySAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2001

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