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Relocation or Proximity? Major Factors Associated with Prolonged Impact Following Dioxin Contamination and Flooding in Missouri*+

Relocation or Proximity? Major Factors Associated with Prolonged Impact Following Dioxin... Original data collected in the AARP-Andrus study were used as basis for comparative study of delayed recovery by disaster type, proximity, and relocation. Disaster samples included 109 flooded, 100 dioxin-contaminated, and 145 affected by both disasters at Times Beach or a total of 354 S's. Proximity (had or still resided on confirmed dioxin sites), and disaster type were significantly associated with delayed recovery. Relocation was not associated with recovery; however, lack of permanent relocation and attitudes toward relocation were found to affect recovery among the dioxin sample; with younger persons reporting greater effects than elders. Data support other studies on chemical disasters; and add the components of examining effects of relocation and proximity, and the prolonged effects of man-made disasters vs. natural disasters. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Mass Emergencies & Disasters SAGE

Relocation or Proximity? Major Factors Associated with Prolonged Impact Following Dioxin Contamination and Flooding in Missouri*+

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References (15)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1992 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0280-7270
eISSN
2753-5703
DOI
10.1177/028072709201000106
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Original data collected in the AARP-Andrus study were used as basis for comparative study of delayed recovery by disaster type, proximity, and relocation. Disaster samples included 109 flooded, 100 dioxin-contaminated, and 145 affected by both disasters at Times Beach or a total of 354 S's. Proximity (had or still resided on confirmed dioxin sites), and disaster type were significantly associated with delayed recovery. Relocation was not associated with recovery; however, lack of permanent relocation and attitudes toward relocation were found to affect recovery among the dioxin sample; with younger persons reporting greater effects than elders. Data support other studies on chemical disasters; and add the components of examining effects of relocation and proximity, and the prolonged effects of man-made disasters vs. natural disasters.

Journal

International Journal of Mass Emergencies & DisastersSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 1992

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