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Revolution, Interrupted: Gender and Microfinance in Nicaragua

Revolution, Interrupted: Gender and Microfinance in Nicaragua Now reaching over 100 million families, the burgeoning microcredit movement has come to play a dominant role in the international development agenda. This is especially true in Nicaragua, where microcredit has supplanted the Sandinistas’ more radical approaches to poverty alleviation and women’s empowerment. Survey and focus group data from borrowers with seven prominent Nicaraguan microfinance institutions show that women benefit less than men from microcredit because they get smaller loans and they invest those loans in less lucrative businesses. Also, these women are constrained by household responsibilities. These findings call into question neoliberal notions that market forces can solve societal problems such as gender inequality. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Critical Sociology SAGE

Revolution, Interrupted: Gender and Microfinance in Nicaragua

Critical Sociology , Volume 38 (2): 20 – Mar 1, 2012

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References (88)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2011
ISSN
0896-9205
eISSN
1569-1632
DOI
10.1177/0896920511404443
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Now reaching over 100 million families, the burgeoning microcredit movement has come to play a dominant role in the international development agenda. This is especially true in Nicaragua, where microcredit has supplanted the Sandinistas’ more radical approaches to poverty alleviation and women’s empowerment. Survey and focus group data from borrowers with seven prominent Nicaraguan microfinance institutions show that women benefit less than men from microcredit because they get smaller loans and they invest those loans in less lucrative businesses. Also, these women are constrained by household responsibilities. These findings call into question neoliberal notions that market forces can solve societal problems such as gender inequality.

Journal

Critical SociologySAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2012

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