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Rising Stars and Underdogs: The Role Race and Parental Education Play in Predicting Mentorship

Rising Stars and Underdogs: The Role Race and Parental Education Play in Predicting Mentorship Research suggests that youth with more financial and social resources are more likely to have access to mentorship. Conversely, the rising star hypothesis posits that youth who show promise through their individual successes are more likely to be mentored. Utilizing a nationally representative sample (N = 4,882), we tested whether demographic characteristics (e.g., race, SES) or personal resources (e.g., academic/social success) are better predictors of receiving mentorship. Regression analyses suggested that demographic, contextual, and individual characteristics all significantly predicted access to mentorship, specifically by non-familial mentors. However, conditional inference tree models that explored the interaction of mentorship predictors by race showed that individual characteristics mattered less for Black and Latino/a youth. Therefore, the rising star hypothesis may hold true for White youth, but the story of mentoring is more complicated for youth of color. Findings highlight the implications of Critical Race Theory for mentoring research and practice. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Youth & Society SAGE

Rising Stars and Underdogs: The Role Race and Parental Education Play in Predicting Mentorship

Youth & Society , Volume OnlineFirst: 1 – Jan 1, 2021

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References (52)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2021
ISSN
0044-118X
eISSN
1552-8499
DOI
10.1177/0044118X211004637
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Research suggests that youth with more financial and social resources are more likely to have access to mentorship. Conversely, the rising star hypothesis posits that youth who show promise through their individual successes are more likely to be mentored. Utilizing a nationally representative sample (N = 4,882), we tested whether demographic characteristics (e.g., race, SES) or personal resources (e.g., academic/social success) are better predictors of receiving mentorship. Regression analyses suggested that demographic, contextual, and individual characteristics all significantly predicted access to mentorship, specifically by non-familial mentors. However, conditional inference tree models that explored the interaction of mentorship predictors by race showed that individual characteristics mattered less for Black and Latino/a youth. Therefore, the rising star hypothesis may hold true for White youth, but the story of mentoring is more complicated for youth of color. Findings highlight the implications of Critical Race Theory for mentoring research and practice.

Journal

Youth & SocietySAGE

Published: Jan 1, 2021

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