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Social Support and Strain from Partner, Family, and Friends: Costs and Benefits for Men and Women in Adulthood

Social Support and Strain from Partner, Family, and Friends: Costs and Benefits for Men and Women... The goals of this study were to (i) examine the association of social support and strain with psychological well-being and health, (ii) investigate whether these associations depended on relationship-type (partner, family, friend), (iii) examine the buffering effects of support on strain (both within and across relationship-type), and (iv) test the extent to which these associations differed by age and sex. The sample contained 2,348 adults (55% male) aged 25 to 75 years (M = 46.3), who were married or cohabitating. Positive and negative social exchanges were more strongly related to psychological well-being than to health. For both sexes, partner support and strain and family support were predictive of well-being measures; partner strain was also predictive of health problems. However, family strain was predictive of well-being and health outcomes more often for women. Further, while we did find evidence that supportive networks could buffer the detrimental effects of strained interactions, friends and family served a buffering role more often for women than for men. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Social and Personal Relationships SAGE

Social Support and Strain from Partner, Family, and Friends: Costs and Benefits for Men and Women in Adulthood

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References (45)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0265-4075
eISSN
1460-3608
DOI
10.1177/0265407500171001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The goals of this study were to (i) examine the association of social support and strain with psychological well-being and health, (ii) investigate whether these associations depended on relationship-type (partner, family, friend), (iii) examine the buffering effects of support on strain (both within and across relationship-type), and (iv) test the extent to which these associations differed by age and sex. The sample contained 2,348 adults (55% male) aged 25 to 75 years (M = 46.3), who were married or cohabitating. Positive and negative social exchanges were more strongly related to psychological well-being than to health. For both sexes, partner support and strain and family support were predictive of well-being measures; partner strain was also predictive of health problems. However, family strain was predictive of well-being and health outcomes more often for women. Further, while we did find evidence that supportive networks could buffer the detrimental effects of strained interactions, friends and family served a buffering role more often for women than for men.

Journal

Journal of Social and Personal RelationshipsSAGE

Published: Feb 1, 2000

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