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Spending School Reform Dollars in Kentucky: Familiar Patterns and New Programs, But Is This Reform?

Spending School Reform Dollars in Kentucky: Familiar Patterns and New Programs, But Is This Reform? School finance reform in Kentucky provided significant new general purpose and categorical revenues to school districts. This analysis of comparative case studies in four high- and low-wealth Kentucky districts asks: Did expenditures increase? Did expenditure patterns change? What did reform dollars buy? In short, expenditures increased in all districts, and spending patterns changed only incrementally, with slight percentage increases directed to instruction. Reform dollars purchased instructional materials, technology, and professional development; they compensated teachers; and they funded new, state-mandated programs. Still, nonprogrammatic financial reporting masked the extent to which reform dollars supported required changes in teaching and learning. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis SAGE

Spending School Reform Dollars in Kentucky: Familiar Patterns and New Programs, But Is This Reform?

Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis , Volume 16 (4): 16 – Dec 1, 1994

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References (14)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0162-3737
eISSN
1935-1062
DOI
10.3102/01623737016004375
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

School finance reform in Kentucky provided significant new general purpose and categorical revenues to school districts. This analysis of comparative case studies in four high- and low-wealth Kentucky districts asks: Did expenditures increase? Did expenditure patterns change? What did reform dollars buy? In short, expenditures increased in all districts, and spending patterns changed only incrementally, with slight percentage increases directed to instruction. Reform dollars purchased instructional materials, technology, and professional development; they compensated teachers; and they funded new, state-mandated programs. Still, nonprogrammatic financial reporting masked the extent to which reform dollars supported required changes in teaching and learning.

Journal

Educational Evaluation and Policy AnalysisSAGE

Published: Dec 1, 1994

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