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State of the Art Reviews: Glycemic Index, Obesity, and Chronic Disease

State of the Art Reviews: Glycemic Index, Obesity, and Chronic Disease There is increasing evidence that both the amount and type of carbohydrate play an important role in weight management and risk of chronic disease. Classifying carbohydrates according to their post-prandial glycemic effect (ie, the glycemic index of foods) has yielded more useful insights than the historical distinctions of simple versus complex chemical structure. Diets based on carbohydrate foods that are more slowly digested and absorbed (ie, low glycemic index diets) have been independently linked to reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and some types of cancer. In individuals with diabetes, intervention studies have shown improvements in insulin sensitivity and glycated hemoglobin concentration with low glycemic index diets. Research also suggests that low glycemic index diets may assist with weight management through effects on satiety and fuel partitioning. Although ongoing research is needed, the current findings, together with the fact that there are no demonstrated negative effects of a low glycemic index diet, suggest that the glycemic index should be an important consideration in the dietary management and prevention of obesity and chronic disease. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine SAGE

State of the Art Reviews: Glycemic Index, Obesity, and Chronic Disease

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References (136)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1559-8276
eISSN
1559-8284
DOI
10.1177/1559827607311514
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that both the amount and type of carbohydrate play an important role in weight management and risk of chronic disease. Classifying carbohydrates according to their post-prandial glycemic effect (ie, the glycemic index of foods) has yielded more useful insights than the historical distinctions of simple versus complex chemical structure. Diets based on carbohydrate foods that are more slowly digested and absorbed (ie, low glycemic index diets) have been independently linked to reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and some types of cancer. In individuals with diabetes, intervention studies have shown improvements in insulin sensitivity and glycated hemoglobin concentration with low glycemic index diets. Research also suggests that low glycemic index diets may assist with weight management through effects on satiety and fuel partitioning. Although ongoing research is needed, the current findings, together with the fact that there are no demonstrated negative effects of a low glycemic index diet, suggest that the glycemic index should be an important consideration in the dietary management and prevention of obesity and chronic disease.

Journal

American Journal of Lifestyle MedicineSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2008

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