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Stress and relationship quality in same-sex couples

Stress and relationship quality in same-sex couples This research focuses on the relationship between sources of minority stress and the quality of same-sex couples’ relationships. Interdependence theory and the minority stress model are used to examine actor-partner effects of internalized homophobia, discrimination, and perceived stress on perceptions of relationship quality in same-sex couples. Couples were recruited through web-based solicitations (N = 131). Path analysis and Kenny’s (1996) technique for examining interdependent relationships for exchangeable dyad members were used to identify between- and within-couple differences. Internalized homophobia and discrimination were found to impact couple members in unique ways. Higher levels of internalized homophobia and discrimination were predictive of less favorable perceptions of relationship quality. As hypothesized, the impact of perceived discrimination and/or victimization was mediated by perceived stress. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Social and Personal Relationships SAGE

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References (55)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0265-4075
eISSN
1460-3608
DOI
10.1177/0265407506060179
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This research focuses on the relationship between sources of minority stress and the quality of same-sex couples’ relationships. Interdependence theory and the minority stress model are used to examine actor-partner effects of internalized homophobia, discrimination, and perceived stress on perceptions of relationship quality in same-sex couples. Couples were recruited through web-based solicitations (N = 131). Path analysis and Kenny’s (1996) technique for examining interdependent relationships for exchangeable dyad members were used to identify between- and within-couple differences. Internalized homophobia and discrimination were found to impact couple members in unique ways. Higher levels of internalized homophobia and discrimination were predictive of less favorable perceptions of relationship quality. As hypothesized, the impact of perceived discrimination and/or victimization was mediated by perceived stress.

Journal

Journal of Social and Personal RelationshipsSAGE

Published: Feb 1, 2006

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